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Connect with ADB through our social media channels and join the conversation on social and economic development in Asia and the Pacific.

 
  • Is changing 9,000 years of eating habits the solution to vitamin A deficiency in poor communities in Asia?
  • Thomas Piketty, a young French economist, has redefined the relationship between capital and inequalities in his book Capital in the Twenty-First Century.
  • Access to household toilets is often seen as just a water and sanitation issue or a public health concern. But the recent murders of two young Indian girls have highlighted another aspect—women’s safety and security.
  • The Open Government Partnership (OGP) is an international platform for domestic reformers committed to making their governments more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens.
  • Very few young doctors and other health professionals want to work in distant geographic locations and this preference for working in urban centers won’t change in the future and might only increase.This problem calls for innovative solutions to bring health services to populations in hard-to-reach locations and Information Technology provides some viable options which need to be scaled up and integrated into public health systems to bridge the rural-urban gap.
  • The establishment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by the United Nations in 2001 was a defining moment. It rallied a global effort in the fight against poverty, hunger, and disease, while promoting universal education, gender equality, and environmental sustainability. However, new challenges have emerged while remaining ones are complex. Meanwhile, the 2015 deadline for achieving the MDGs is almost upon us, raising the question: where do we go from here?
  • With some 60% of the global youth population living in Asia and the Pacific, young people have consistently and increasingly shown they are capable of addressing urgent development problems through their innovative ideas.
  • I see dead people. No, I don’t mean ghosts like the ones a young Haley Joel Osment could see in the 1999 hit film The Sixth Sense. I mean actual dead bodies. I see them all the time, victims of the seemingly lawless and definitely dangerous free-for-all that is driving on Cambodia’s national roads.
  • Social protection programs are increasingly important for supporting vulnerable groups in Asia, including the poor and elderly, but fragmented delivery of services is undermining their impact and effectiveness.
  • The conventional view of wage gaps between men and women is that they have been steadily narrowing over recent decades and this trend will inevitably continue as women achieve higher education levels and enter areas of the workforce which have been dominated by males in the past. Unfortunately recent evidence from Indonesia suggests that pay parity between the sexes remains some way off.  
  • The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus, or MERS-CoV, (MERS) is keeping infectious diseases experts on alert lately, although the World Health Organization (WHO) hasn’t declared MERS a global emergency.
  • ADB, World Bank and several others have launched the iChallenge in an effort to crowd source ideas for indicators that can measure government capacity and performance.
  • The rise of mega-regionals such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) suggest that the world trade system is fragmenting to appear more like a jigsaw puzzle than a spaghetti bowl. How do we resolve the growing mess?
  • When we look around the world there often seems a huge divide between young people and governments. While youth are frequently on the front line of civilian protests, criticizing the state, those in power often brand them as mere troublemakers and ingrates. How can we narrow this gap and help both sides better understand each other?
  • As the world marks International Day of Action for Women's Health, maternal deaths are an uncomfortable reminder that much work still needs to be done. Indonesia is a case in point. While it is one of the fast growing economic powerhouses in Asia it is also experiencing a worrying rise in maternal deaths.
  • Why are there so few women in senior management or “at the top” of the pyramid when Asia has had more female state leaders than even Europe? Is it a lack of education? Is it age old culture and tradition? Are the boys’ networks keeping women out? And why does this continue when there is clear evidence that more women in leadership is good for the bottom line?
  • The messages from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are clear—human induced climate change is happening, climate impacts on humans and natural systems will be significant, and dramatic mitigation needs to happen very soon.
  • In ensuring the success of social protection programs, who benefits from public transfers is as important as how much or what type of support is provided. Tajikistan offers a case in point.
  • Debating empowers young people, builds oral presentation skills, develops confidence in public speaking, and trains debaters to listen, assess and form arguments. Recognizing this, ADB over the last four years has been supporting youth debates in Asia and the Pacific.
  • We’ve wrapped up our 47th Annual Meeting in Astana today with plenty of food for thought on what lies ahead for our vast, diverse region.
  • The ADB Annual Meeting is themed “Connecting Asia with the Changing World,” but it is just as much about connecting the world with a changing Asia. Asian success stories have broken down the old distinctions between rich countries and poor, developing and developing, development assistance providers and aid recipients.
  • Almost 1,500 years ago in the sixth and seventh century, southern Kazakhstan was part of the famous Silk Road that carried goods, ideas and cultural influences from as far as China to Europe.
  • Where are Asia’s economies headed to in the short and long term? What shape are they in to withstand future financial crises? And how can they respond to the yawning rich-poor divide, now a key concern among Asian and global policymakers? These were some of the key points discussed over the first two days of business at our 47th Annual Meeting, held in Astana, Kazakhstan.
  • With its stunning, modern architecture, crisp blue skies, and myriad influences, Kazakhstan’s capital, Astana, provides a dramatic backdrop for ADB’s 47th Meeting of the Board of Governors that starts 2 May and concludes three days later.
  • Providing a decent, secure and dignified way of life for the elderly is set to become one of the most pressing concerns facing policymakers in Asia in coming years. Right now the region has a seemingly endless supply of young working age people. But within a quarter century many countries will have equally large numbers reaching retirement age.
  • Developing Asia’s impressive growth continues but faces a new challenge — inequality is on the rise. Over the last few decades, the region has lifted people out of poverty at an unprecedented rate. But more recent experience contrasts with the ‘growth with equity’ story that characterised the newly industrialised economies’ transformation in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Central Asia has for centuries been seen as a neglected Russian “backyard,” but international interest in the region has increased over the last two decades because of its vast stores of energy and natural resources. To achieve a brighter future the region must pursue greater economic integration.
  • The global market for sukuk – or Islamic debt securities – has soared from a tiny US$15 billion in 2001 to US$281 billion in 2013. Helping issuers tap the large pool of funds seeking shari’ah-compliant investments would help lower the cost of financing infrastructure, while the innovative profit-sharing structures of some sukuk could also lower the risk of financing such projects.
  • Asia’s drive to urbanize is taking an increasing toll on the environment with growing mountains of solid waste as city dwellers consume and discard resources at an ever increasing rate.   If “green” cities are to be the answer to these environmental stresses then they will need to develop much more effective programs to reduce, reuse, recycle and recover waste.
  • The US Fed has been winding down its bond purchase program, widely known as “quantitative easing,” since December 2013. The program was introduced in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis to fight the recession and foster a rapid economic recovery. With the improvement in the US economy, the Fed suggested at its policy meeting in March that the program may end this coming fall and it may start raising interest rates about six months from then.

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