ADB Supporting Food Sustainability

Video | 5 June 2013

ADB is helping combat hunger by raising food productivity, while at the same time, supporting initiatives to reduce food waste.

Transcript

Title: ADB Supporting Food Sustainability

Description: ADB is helping combat hunger by raising food productivity, while at the same time, supporting initiatives to reduce food waste.

VO: While many sectors say Asia and the Pacific is on the rise economically in the 21st century, the region still faces numerous development challenges.

Among the issues that confront the continent is hunger.

The situation is most dire in South Asia – where six out of every ten people do not have enough to eat.

The Asian Development Bank is doing its share to combat hunger by building roads that link farmers directly to markets – enabling them to sell their crops at a cheaper price due to lower transportation costs. This means more consumers can buy fresher food at an affordable price.

ADB is also investing in other areas that help raise food productivity.

SOT: Lourdes Adriano
Agriculture Expert
Asian Development Bank
And we do that through irrigation, which obviously increases produce. Resilience is another important factor—meaning resilience of the communities to food price volatility and climate change. And again our investments in climate change, both in adaptation and mitigation, help towards making our communities more resilient

VO: Ironically while many remain hungry, recent statistics from the Food and Agriculture Organization say that roughly one third – or 1.3 billion tons of food produced for human consumption globally per year - goes to waste.

Profound changes in the food and agriculture system are needed in order to maximize food resources to feed more people.

One relatively easy way to do this is to reduce food waste at the consumption level.

Annie Guerrero of Zero Waste Philippines - and owner of a local restaurant in Manila - practices food sustainability in her restaurant.

Discarded food items such as coffee grounds and fish entrails are not thrown into the dust bin.

Instead they are transformed into fertilizer for plants such as lettuce grown in an eco-center Annie created.

The lettuce is then served at the restaurant.

In Singapore, a non-profit organization called Food from the Heart collects unsold bread and pastries from bakeries and hotels and distributes them to welfare organizations and needy individuals in an effort to reduce food waste.

While in Japan, the parent company of convenience store chain 711 along with food recycling company Agri Gaia System turns food waste into animal feed.

SOT: Lourdes Adriano
Agriculture Expert
Asian Development Bank
Incremental steps actually result to giant steps… we need everybody to work in it.

VO: These simple but effective methods in reducing food waste can help shape a more sustainable future – eventually feeding more people in the region and the rest of the world.