Empowering Women in Asia and the Pacific through New Millennium Development Goals

Video | 4 March 2014

Roberta Clarke, UN Women Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific, discusses how the post-2015 Millennium Development Goal agenda should more fully empower women.

Transcript

Title: Empowering Women in Asia and the Pacific through New Millennium Development Goals

Description: Roberta Clarke, UN Women Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific, discusses how the post-2015 Millennium Development Goal agenda should more fully empower women.

Roberta Clarke
UN Women Regional Director for Asia and the Pacific

The transformative agenda is about voice, choice and safety.  So, that the UN women understands how the agenda should be built out. In relation to voice it is doubling down on the commitment to secure women’s equal participation in parliaments. You know, women's involvement in decision-making at the highest levels is important for structuring national agendas, as well as securing equal women's participation in the decision making, so that’s one. But also women's involvement in private sector boards. You know, so where decisions about resource allocations are made, women must be more involved on the basis of equality, public sector boards and private sector boards. And of course decision-making in the household, which includes decision-making about reproductive health and rights. So, that’s around the questions on voice.

On the questions about choice and violence against women means reducing dramatically the vulnerability of women and girls to all forms of violence against women – domestic violence, sexual assaults in the community, child marriage, sexual harassment in the work place, trafficking. Reducing that dramatically as we know it’s a global negative phenomenon. And that means a number of sectors will have to be involved. We got to have better prevention, we got to have a better response, so that’s for violence.

And in the agenda in increasing women’s capabilities. And that capabilities is in relation to women’s access to resources. We know for example in the Asia and the Pacific, women don’t have equal title to land, there may be equality guarantee to them in the law and the Constitution but in fact there’s no equality actually on ownership of resources and in particular land. So we know for example, access to land, access to technology, access to credit that’s very important for women’s economic empowerment. And of course access to skills, vocational skills, technological skills, and education are also important for women’s capabilities, so to increase those base skills women’s capabilities so that in fact they can be engage in the economic sector on an equal and productive footing.