In Bangladesh, Kids are Staying in School Longer | Asian Development Bank

In Bangladesh, Kids are Staying in School Longer

Video | 1 August 2014

By 2025, Bangladesh will have a work force that is 78 million people strong. Proper teaching in schools is key to preparing these workers of the future for productive jobs and unlocking the country’s wealth. Quality education depends on quality teachers so the government is focusing efforts on helping to train and prepare teachers. A decade ago most secondary school teachers in Bangladesh had no proper training and textbooks were outdated. In recent years, the Ministry of Education has been training teachers to use modern methods. The results are impressive. Enrollment rates have gone up and drop out rates have gone down. Far fewer students have to repeat grades and the pass rates for public exams have soared 48% over the past 10 years. That’s good for students entering the workforce and will help the Bangladesh economy reap the rewards of its coming demographic dividend.

Transcript

Title: In Bangladesh, Kids are Staying in School Longer

Description: By 2025, Bangladesh will have a work force that is 78 million people strong. Proper teaching in schools is key to preparing these workers of the future for productive jobs and unlocking the country’s wealth. Quality education depends on quality teachers so the government is focusing efforts on helping to train and prepare teachers. A decade ago most secondary school teachers in Bangladesh had no proper training and textbooks were outdated. In recent years, the Ministry of Education has been training teachers to use modern methods. The results are impressive. Enrollment rates have gone up and drop out rates have gone down. Far fewer students have to repeat grades and the pass rates for public exams have soared 48% over the past 10 years. That’s good for students entering the workforce and will help the Bangladesh economy reap the rewards of its coming demographic dividend.

VO: By 2025, Bangladesh would have a work force that is 78 million people strong. Proper teaching in schools is key to preparing those workers of the future for productive jobs and unlocking the country’s wealth.

SOT: Nurul Islam Nahid
Minister
Bangladesh Ministry of Education
Quality education must be granted by the support of the quality teachers. And that’s why we give priority to prepare teachers.

VO: A decade ago most secondary school teachers in Bangladesh have no proper teacher training. Students in the classroom learn there lessons by work and textbooks were sadly obsolete. Since then, the Asian Development Bank has been working with the Ministry of Education to train teachers with modern teaching methods in language classes and elsewhere.

SOT: Masuka Tabassum
Student, Kamrunessa Girls High School
Classes are different nowadays. We are learning in greater detail. Now we can learn many new things, our vocabulary is getting rich.

VO: Over 300,00 teachers in private and government secondary schools and Madrasas, plus thousands of head teachers and education administrators have received training that includes many women teachers and others specially trained to work with students in remote areas from ethnic minorities and those with special needs.

SOT: Jebun Nesa
Assistant Teacher
Kamrunessa Girls High School
You cannot only be textbook oriented if you want to teach the students what they have in their syllabus these days. We use multimedia or modern teaching techniques to make the topics more interesting and more comprehensible to them.

VO: A standardized Bachelor of Education certificate means schools know what to expect from their teachers. Meanwhile, a more robust national teacher education counsel monitors teacher training right across the country. The results are clear. Enrollment rates have gone up and drop out rates have gone down. Far fewer students have to repeat grades and the pass rates for public exams have soared 48% over the past 10 years. That’s good for students entering the workforce and will help the Bangladesh economy reap the rewards of its coming demographic dividend.