Project Name VIE: GMS Southern Coastal Corridor Project
Project Number 36353-013
Country Regional
Project Status Approved
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Loan
Source of Funding / Amount
Grant 0095-REG: VIE: Greater Mekong Subregion Southern Coastal Corridor Project (Cambodia and Vietnam)
Australian Grant US$ 25.50 million
Grant 0096-REG: VIE: Greater Mekong Subregion Southern Coastal Corridor Project (Cambodia and Vietnam)
Australian Grant US$ 8.00 million
Loan 2372-REG: VIE: Greater Mekong Subregion Southern Coastal Corridor Project (Cambodia and Vietnam)
Asian Development Fund US$ 75.00 million
Loan 2373-REG: CAM: Greater Mekong Subregion Southern Transport Corridor Project (Cambodia and Vietnam)
Asian Development Fund US$ 7.00 million
Strategic Agendas Inclusive economic growth
Drivers of Change Partnerships
Sector / Subsector Transport - Road transport (non-urban)
Gender Equity and Mainstreaming No gender elements
Description The Project will complete the Greater Mekong Subregion Southern Coastal Corridor (GMS-SCC) in Cambodia and Viet Nam. The Project will include the following components: (i) Rehabilitation of Transport Infrastructure. In Cambodia 15 km of NR33 will be improved to the border with Viet Nam at Preak Chak. In Viet Nam 89.5 km of National Highway (QL) 80 and QL63 will be improved, include construction of two large bridges across the Cai Be and Cai Lon Rivers; (ii) Cross Border Facilities. A new cross border facility will be provided, the design will take into account the ongoing work on the implementation of the GMS Cross-Border Transport Agreement; (iii) HIV/AIDS and trafficking awareness and prevention; and (iv) Road maintenance in Cambodia.
Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy The ADB's Regional Cooperation Strategy and Program Update for the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) includes four strategic pillars the first of which addresses strengthening connectivity and facilitating cross-border movement and tourism. Although subregional traffic is still modest, the governments of the GMS countries, give high priority to the development of transport infrastructure links that will facilitate regional and international trade and economic cooperation. The high priority given to cooperation in the transport sector is because of the poor state of the transport infrastructure in most of the GMS that is a major constraint to economic growth, trade and other forms of cooperation. By reducing travel times and vehicle operating costs along the GMS-SCC the Project will encourage economic activities in the affected provinces, provide employment opportunities for the local population, and improve access to social services. At the national level, the Project responds to both Governments? infrastructure development emphasis on improving the national road network to allow more effective access and induce economic growth and to improve the GMS road network.
Impact Promotion of economic growth in the project area and GMS by strengthening connectivity with neighboring countries and increasing competitiveness
Project Outcome
Description of Outcome Reduce transport times and costs, and induce more efficient movement of passengers and goods within the project area and between GMS countries
Progress Toward Outcome

Viet Nam component: Civil works have started in April 2011. Based on the findings of the midterm review mission in December 2011, achieving the project's intended outomce is likely provided that corrective measures are implemented effectively (i.e. improvement of soft soil treatment measures and resolving pending resettlement issues). To address this, Additional Financing of $12 million grant from AusAID for soft soil treatement, and $25 million ADF loan for resettelement and cost overruns were approved by ADB on 11 February 2013 which became 16 September 2013.

Cambodia component: Outcome not yet achieved but on track.

Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

Completion of the road and bridge improvements enabling unrestricted passenger and freight transport

Border facilities constructed

HIV/AIDS and trafficking awareness and prevention programs completed on the project road

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)

Civil works started in Apr 2011 and completed in Mar 2014

Civil works started in April 2011, 80% completion

Civil works started in April 2011, 85% completion

Bridges completed in Feb 2014

Current cross-border processing times are well below targets. This output will be implemented under additional financing for Second SCCP

Ongoing under supervision contract

Geographical Location The Southern Coastal Corridor runs along the Gulf of Thailand coast from Bangkok through Thailand, Cambodia, and ends at Nam Can in the south of Viet Nam. The overall corridor length is 924 kilometers (km).
Safeguard Categories
Environment B
Involuntary Resettlement A
Indigenous Peoples B
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects

The project corridor in southern Cambodia contains no designated forest, wildlife, or rare and endangered species or habitats. Exhaust and noise emissions from vehicles are not serious problems along the corridor. However, during dry seasons, laterite dust from passing vehicles creates serious dust clouds affecting the quality of life for all living along the roadway and up to 75 m on either side. Paving the road and shoulders will eliminate this problem. During construction, a watering schedule will be required to minimize the temporary impact on air quality of dust generated by construction activities. A potential impact during operation of the border crossings will be the wastewater and solid wastes generated at the customs and immigration facilities, if these wastes are not managed properly. A primary waste treatment facility will be designed and installed to service the new buildings to minimize the potential impacts. Garbage will be managed by contracting a local worker to collect and dispose of solid wastes. It is assessed that most of the potential impacts of the Cambodian section are during the construction stage; these are of a nature temporary and can be managed effectively by mitigation measures. An environmental management plan (EMP) and monitoring program have been prepared and will be implemented by MPWT during the construction and operation periods. Appropriate clauses will be included in civil works contracts to ensure the implementation of the EMP.

The project corridor in southern Viet Nam lies in the Mekong Delta, which has a dense network of waterways and navigable canals. There are two ecologically sensitive sites in the region, which were identified by BirdLife International in Indochina as important habitats for endangered birds and mammals. However, the project corridor is far from the two sites and none of the project activities would affect these sites. Major environmental concerns of the Project in the Vietnamese section are the interference of ship traffic caused by poor design of bridges and water quality because of disturbance of acid sulphate soils in localized areas. The EA will ensure the bridge designs allow sufficient navigation clearances. The EA will also ensure implementation of mitigation measures identified in the EMP to minimize impacts of acid soil on water quality and surrounding aquaculture activities. It is assessed that most of the potential impacts of the Viet Nam section are during the construction stage; these are of a nature temporary and can be managed effectively by mitigation measures. An EMP and monitoring program have been prepared, and will be implemented by PMU-MT during construction and by VRA during operation periods. Appropriate clauses will be included in civil works contracts to ensure implementation of the EMP.

Involuntary Resettlement

The most serious impact will be the loss of land caused by road widening or realignment. In Cambodia, 330 affected households have residential and/or commercial land assets in the national road (NR) 33 corridor of impact and the area required for the cross-border facility, and will require compensation and relocation. Another 265 affected households will be seriously affected by loss of rice-growing land in the road corridor of impact. A full resettlement plan (RP) has been prepared for Cambodia. In Viet Nam, two full RPs have been prepared one for

Kien Giang Province and one for Ca Mau Province. Several thousand APs will be displaced from their housing and/or small shops and others will be displaced from agricultural land. Survey work continues to define impacts to be addressed in the RPs.

Indigenous Peoples In the Viet Nam project area, the Khmer ethnic minority group accounts for about 2% of the population in Ca Mau Province and 12% of the population in Keing Giang Province, or about 7% in the project area overall. There are no ethnic minority people in the Cambodia project area. In Viet Nam, ethnic minority households (Khmer) in the project area speak both Vietnamese and Khmer (especially men). Khmer people are well integrated into the mainstream. Like the majority Kinh Vietnamese, rural ethnic Khmer cultivate rice and/or engage in shrimp farming. However, the total number of Khmer households engaged in wage labor is higher (13.6%) than the mainstream Kinh population (4.7%). Urban ethnic Khmer are shopkeepers or engaged in nonfarm activities. In both Kein Giang and Ca Mau, nearly all APs including ethnic minorities are classified nonpoor. However, in Ha Tien district of Kein Giang, 21% AP Khmer households are engaged as laborers. The Project will not have a differential impact on Khmer people than the mainstream Vietnamese and an ethnic minority development plan is not required.
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design During the feasibility study of the Project, consultations were held with relevant stakeholders including the communities affected by the road. The community perspective on the Project, in terms of positive and negative impacts, was discussed. The community felt that roads to market and school might be more accessible because of the Project. Less vehicle damage was considered an important benefit because of the improved road. Road safety was noted as a serious concern of local residents.
During Project Implementation

Environmental monitoring during construction phase includes documentation of affected people's complaints on the Project's environmental performance and the corresponding plan of action or actions taken to resolve such complaints.

Cuu Long CIPM, together with the local authorities and supervision consultants are monitoring all resettlement-related activities. In addition, Cuu Long engage an independent monitor to conduct an independent review and evaluation of resettlement activities on a quarterly basis.

Business Opportunities
Consulting Services

For all ADB and Government of Australia financed consulting services, international and national consultants will be recruited through a firm in accordance with ADB's Guidelines on the Use of Consultants and will use ADB's quality and costbased recruitment procedures.

Cambodia. Consultants for the Cambodian component of the Project will be recruited under two packages. A firm of consultants will be recruited to undertake the DDIS services under a contract to be financed using Government of Australia grant funds. For this contract, about 409 person-months of input will be required (about 47 person-months from international experts and about 362 of national experts). In addition, national Independent Resettlement Monitoring company will be recruited with experience in resettlement planning and social analysis on similar internationally funded infrastructure projects to monitor implementation of resettlement plans.

Viet Nam. Consultants will be recruited under three separate packages. Under the ADB and Government of Australia funded components, one package (ADB DDIS package) will cover detailed design and construction supervision of the ADB and Government of Australia funded section, and the HIV/AIDS and trafficking awareness and prevention program. It is proposed that this package be funded from Government of Australia grant funds. For this contract, about 1,643 person-months of input will be required (about 137 person-months international and 1,506 national). Under the Government of the Republic of Korea funded component, a single package will be prepared for the Government of the Republic of Korea DDIS services with recruitment following Republic of Korea procedures. For this contract, about 1,348 person-months of input will be required (about 109 person-months international and 1,239 national). In addition, national Independent Resettlement Monitoring company will be recruited with experience in resettlement planning and social analysis on similar internationally funded infrastructure projects to monitor implementation of resettlement plans.

Procurement

Procurement of all ADB and Government of Australia financed works will be in accordance with ADB's Procurement Guidelines. Procurement of civil works under the Government of the Republic of Korea funded component will be subject to Republic of Korea procurement guidelines and procedures.

Cambodia. Separate civil works contracts will be procured for (i) improvement of NR33 between the border with Viet Nam at Preak Chak and Kampong Trach; (ii) cross-border facilities at Preak Chak; (iii) cross-border facilities at Koh Kong, and (iv) replacement of bridges and culverts along the Kampong Trach Kampot road section. These contracts will be procured using international competitive bidding (ICB) procedures. Civil works under the maintenance component will be packaged through a number of contracts, where contracts costing more than $100,000 and less than $1 million may follow national competitive bidding (NCB) procedures acceptable to ADB.

Viet Nam. All procurement will be managed by the IA with assistance from the DDIS consultants. For the ADB and Government of Australia funded components, there will be two major civil works contracts (one each for the An Minh Bypass Nga Bac Canal, and the Nga Bac Canal Industrial Complex sections) to be procured using ADB's ICB procedures with prequalification; documentation will be subject to prior review. Other smaller civil works contracts

partly or wholly financed by ADB and costing more than $100,000 and less than $2 million may follow NCB procedures acceptable to ADB.

Responsible ADB Officer Shihiru Date
Responsible ADB Department Southeast Asia Department
Responsible ADB Division Transport and Communications Division, SERD
Executing Agencies
Viet Nam Road Administration, Min. of TransportMr. Duong Tuan MinhMy Thuan Project Management Unit (PMU-MT), Ministry of Transport, 127B Dinh Tien Hoang, Ho Chi Min City, Vietnam
Timetable
Concept Clearance 05 Aug 2005
Fact Finding 09 Mar 2007 to 22 Mar 2007
MRM 14 Dec 2006
Approval 28 Nov 2007
Last Review Mission -
PDS Creation Date 16 Nov 2006
Last PDS Update 17 Mar 2015

Grant 0095-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
28 Nov 2007 10 Jan 2008 29 May 2008 30 Jun 2015 - -
Financing Plan Grant Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 25.50 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 28 Nov 2007 0.00 23.67 93%
Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 25.50 28 Nov 2007 0.00 21.08 83%

Grant 0096-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
28 Nov 2007 11 Dec 2007 11 Dec 2007 31 Dec 2012 31 Dec 2014 -
Financing Plan Grant Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 8.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 28 Nov 2007 0.00 7.70 96%
Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 8.00 28 Nov 2007 0.00 7.58 95%

Loan

Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 111.90 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 %
Counterpart 111.90 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 %

Loan 2372-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
28 Nov 2007 10 Jan 2008 29 May 2008 30 Jun 2015 - -
Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 183.20 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 75.00 28 Nov 2007 71.36 0.00 98%
Counterpart 108.20 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 28 Nov 2007 54.58 0.00 75%
Status of Covenants
Category Sector Safeguards Social Financial Economic Others
Rating - Satisfactory - - - Satisfactory

Loan 2373-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
28 Nov 2007 18 Feb 2008 12 Aug 2008 31 Dec 2012 31 Dec 2014 -
Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 10.70 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 7.00 28 Nov 2007 6.76 0.00 99%
Counterpart 3.70 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 28 Nov 2007 6.42 0.00 94%
Status of Covenants
Category Sector Safeguards Social Financial Economic Others
Rating - Satisfactory - - - Satisfactory

This project data sheet was generated from http://www.adb.org/projects/36353-013/main on 02 September 2015