Bangladesh: Padma Multipurpose Bridge Project

Sovereign Project | 35049-013

Summary

The Project will build the first fixed crossing across the Padma River for road traffic comprising (a) a two-level steel truss composite bridge 6.15 km long, the top deck to accommodate a four-lane highway and the lower deck to accommodate a single-track railway to be added in the future; (b) 12.0 km of approach roads, 1.5 km on the Mawa side and 10.5 km on the Janjira side; (c) bridge-end facilities including toll plazas and service areas; and (d) river training with dredging and bank protection works, 1.5 km on the Mawa side and 12 km on the Janjira side, to regulate flow and prevent damage to the bridge structure. The Project will also have a component to develop cost-recovery mechanisms to ensure investment sustainability and to carry out institutional capacity building to ensure sustainable asset management.

Latest Project Documents


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Project Name Padma Multipurpose Bridge Project
Project Number 35049-013
Country Bangladesh
Project Status Dropped / Terminated
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Loan
Source of Funding / Amount
Loan 2701-BAN: Padma Multipurpose Bridge Project
Ordinary capital resources US$ 539.00 million
Loan 2702-BAN: Padma Multipurpose Bridge Project
Asian Development Fund US$ 76.00 million
Strategic Agendas Inclusive economic growth
Drivers of Change Governance and capacity development
Sector / Subsector Transport - Road transport (non-urban)
Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
Description The Project will build the first fixed crossing across the Padma River for road traffic comprising (a) a two-level steel truss composite bridge 6.15 km long, the top deck to accommodate a four-lane highway and the lower deck to accommodate a single-track railway to be added in the future; (b) 12.0 km of approach roads, 1.5 km on the Mawa side and 10.5 km on the Janjira side; (c) bridge-end facilities including toll plazas and service areas; and (d) river training with dredging and bank protection works, 1.5 km on the Mawa side and 12 km on the Janjira side, to regulate flow and prevent damage to the bridge structure. The Project will also have a component to develop cost-recovery mechanisms to ensure investment sustainability and to carry out institutional capacity building to ensure sustainable asset management.
Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy

Bangladesh is a riverine country, and the major rivers flowing through it are the Ganges, Jamuna, Meghna, and Padma. Historically, this river system has split Bangladesh into (i) the northwest zone, bordered by the Ganges and Jamuna rivers; (ii) the east zone, which is east of the Jamuna River, where the capital, Dhaka, and the major port, Chittagong, are situated; and (iii) the southwest zone, isolated by the Padma and Ganges rivers. The Padma River is formed by the confluence of the Ganges and the Jamuna rivers. The river, about 5 km wide with braided, turbulent, and shifting flows, has been a major transport barrier between the southwest zone and the northwest and east zones. At present, passengers and freight are transported across the river by ferry and, to a lesser extent, by launches and rowboats. Their services are grossly inadequate in terms of both capacity and service level. Existing ferry services involve long and unpredictable waits at terminals lacking basic amenities. Flooding, fog, and other difficult weather conditions routinely cause services to be suspended or cancelled.

The completion of the Jamuna bridge in June 1998 improved the connectivity of the northwest zone to the economically important east zone, thus accelerating the former's socioeconomic development and alleviating poverty in the country as a whole. Similar impacts are expected with the opening of the proposed Padma bridge. The bridge is expected to have subregional impacts by forming part of the Asian Highway Route A-1, the main Asian Highway route connecting Asia to Europe.

The pre-feasibility study conducted with government financing in 1999 2000 established the technical and economic viability of a bridge across the Padma River. A more comprehensive feasibility study undertaken in 2001 2005 by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) reaffirmed the technical and economic viability of building the bridge at the Mawa Janjira crossing. During the feasibility study, the government requested the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Japan Bank for International Cooperation, and World Bank to extend their support for constructing the bridge through a cofinancing arrangement similar to that adopted for the Jamuna bridge. The development partners came to an understanding that (i) the project is too large to be financed by a single aid agency, (ii) the exemplary development partner coordination and cooperation achieved for constructing the Jamuna bridge should be replicated for the Padma bridge, and (iii) subsequent project preparation would be carried out jointly.

In 2005, ADB provided technical assistance (TA) to complement JICA's feasibility study, which confirmed the technical and economic viability of the Padma bridge. The TA aimed as well to develop a public private partnership (PPP) for the project, which would have required several preparatory measures and conditions such as (i) creating an enabling environment for what is a new concept in Bangladesh through a comprehensive fiscal, financial, and legal policy framework, (ii) building capacity in the executing agency; and (iii) implementing a vast public communication plan. The TA therefore did not recommend pursuing PPP. However, it is envisaged that the operation and maintenance of the bridge will involve the private sector.

ADB processed a TA loan of $17.6 million in 2007 to finance (i) consultants to prepare detailed design and help the Bangladesh Bridge Authority (BBA) with tendering, (ii) an engineering review to confirm the selected deliverables of the design consultants, and (iii) a panel of reputed international and national experts to provide advisory services to BBA. The World Bank is assisting, under a $3 million project preparatory facility, with (i) an independent review of social and environmental safeguard documents, (ii) financial due diligence, (iii) the strengthening of BBA, and (iv) additional financing for the panel of experts.

The government accords very high priority to the project, which is included in ADB's 2010 2012 country operations business plan for Bangladesh as a firm loan for 2010 processing. Since mobilizing the design consultants, ADB, the Islamic Development Bank, JICA, and the World Bank have fielded joint missions to deal with various aspects of project preparation.

Impact Accelerated economic growth in the southwest zone of Bangladesh
Project Outcome
Description of Outcome Improved surface transport between Dhaka and the southwest zone of Bangladesh.
Progress Toward Outcome
Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

1. First fixed crossing across the Padma River for road traffic

2. Cost recovery mechanisms to ensure investment sustainability

3. Institutional capacity for asset management

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)
Geographical Location The Padma Bridge will connect the southwest region with the Dhaka capital region across the Padma Bridge at the Mawa-Jaujira Crossing Point.
Safeguard Categories
Environment A
Involuntary Resettlement A
Indigenous Peoples C
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects

Considering that this is a large project involving significant changes in land use and impacts on wildlife, the project has been classified environmental category A in accordance with ADB's Safeguard Policy Statement (2009). To investigate the various environmental impacts in the project area, studies have included an (i) initial environmental examination of resettlement sites, (ii) environmental impact assessment (including environmental management and monitoring plan [EMMP]), (iii) environmental quality baseline monitoring survey, and (iv) ecological report. Further, climate change has been factored into the design of the project. The reports have been prepared in accordance with the requirements of ADB, JICA, and the World Bank. To ensure proper environmental impact monitoring, the baseline data provided in the environmental impact assessment report will be further verified and updated before the start of project implementation.

The EMMP and environmental codes of practice for 19 environmental issues have been developed to help minimize environmental impacts. These cover managing waste and hazardous materials, controlling erosion and sedimentation, and protecting fauna through such measures as timing and locating construction to avoid disturbing the migration and breeding of hilsa fish. Contractors will prepare further detailed construction environmental action plans (CEAPs) based on the EMMP and environmental codes of practice. The CEAPs will be contract documents used for monitoring by the construction supervision consultant and an independent external monitor. Quarterly and annual progress reports on the implementation of CEAPs will be submitted to ADB. The EMMP will be revised by the construction supervision consultant and contractors to reflect any changes in project components. Adequate budget provision has been made for implementing CEAPs and EMMP.

Involuntary Resettlement The project is classified involuntary resettlement category A and indigenous peoples category C in accordance with ADB's Safeguard Policy Statement (2009). A 100% census based on the detailed design identified 13,578 households that will suffer impacts on livelihoods and assets such as income from day labor, agricultural land, residential and commercial assets, and trees. Of this number, 3,886 will be physically displaced and 9,692 will be economically displaced. A resettlement framework and three separate resettlement action plans have been prepared based on ADB's Safeguard Policy Statement and other cofinanciers' safeguard polices to address all losses. The complete details of compensation rates for the loss of assets, development of resettlement sites, shifting and transitional assistance, and other income-restoration assistance, including additional support for vulnerable groups, are in the entitlement matrixes of the resettlement action plans. Four resettlement sites are being developed for displaced households. BBA will provide sufficient funds for the timely implementation of resettlement and social action plans.
Indigenous Peoples No impact on indigenous people is envisaged.
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design Public consultation began in the project area in 1999 as part of the first pre-feasibility study and continued throughout project preparation. Surveyed households perceive the socioeconomic benefits of the project as (i) improved access to socioeconomic services, (ii) increased employment opportunities, and (iii) improved transport services that will reduce poverty in the region. A public consultation and participation plan has been developed for project implementation to ensure that adequate and timely information is made available to the affected people.
During Project Implementation tbd
Business Opportunities
Consulting Services Civil works will be carried out by international civil works contractors selected through international competitive bidding and supervised by a firm of international construction supervision consultants. To aid BBA in its capacity as the employer under International Federation of Consulting Engineers conditions of contract and assist with managing the project and monitoring its impact, a firm of management support consultants will be engaged. Both consultancy services will be financed using the proceeds of a loan from the World Bank.
Procurement Civil works to be financed by loans from the cofinanciers have been packaged into contracts for (i) the main bridge, estimated to cost $1,300 million, with ADB, JICA, and World Bank financing; (ii) river training works, estimated to cost $800 million, with ADB and World Bank financing; (iii) approach roads and bridge-end facilities on the Mawa side, estimated to cost $35 million, with World Bank financing; (iv) approach roads and bridge-end facilities on the Janjira side, estimated to cost $160 million, with Islamic Development Bank financing; and (v) the service area on the Janjira side, estimated to cost $30 million, with World Bank financing.
Responsible ADB Officer Witoon Tawisook
Responsible ADB Department South Asia Department
Responsible ADB Division Transport and Communications Division, SARD
Executing Agencies
Bangladesh Bridge AuthoritySetu Bhaban, New Airport Road
Banani, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Timetable
Concept Clearance 16 Apr 2010
Fact Finding 13 Jun 2010 to 16 Jun 2010
MRM 16 Jul 2010
Approval 25 Nov 2010
Last Review Mission -
PDS Creation Date 06 Jun 2006
Last PDS Update 22 Mar 2011

Loan

Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 660.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 %
Counterpart 660.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 %

Loan 2701-BAN

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
25 Nov 2010 06 Jun 2011 - 30 Jun 2016 - 07 Aug 2013
Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 1,199.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 539.00 25 Nov 2010 0.00 0.00 0%
Counterpart 660.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 25 Nov 2010 0.00 0.00 0%

Loan 2702-BAN

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
25 Nov 2010 06 Jun 2011 - 30 Jun 2016 - 07 Aug 2013
Financing Plan Loan Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 76.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 76.00 25 Nov 2010 0.00 0.00 0%
Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 0.00 25 Nov 2010 0.00 0.00 0%

Evaluation Documents

See also: Independent Evaluation

No documents found.


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