State of the Coral Triangle: Indonesia

Publication | May 2014

This report assesses Indonesia’s coastal ecosystems, particularly their exploited resources. It describes the threats to these ecosystems, and explains the country’s plans to ensure their future sustainable use.

Indonesia is the largest archipelagic state in the world, and its coral reefs are the most extensive in Southeast Asia. Its coastal communities are home to at least 300 ethnic groups, all of which depend heavily on coastal and marine resources for food and income.

Unfortunately, pollution from human activity and overexploitation of the country’s fisheries, put Indonesia at risk in food security and vulnerability to climate change. Policy makers, resource managers, and coastal community residents require accurate, complete, and timely information to successfully address these threats.

This report assesses Indonesia’s coastal ecosystems, particularly their exploited resources. It describes the threats to these ecosystems, and explains the country’s plans to ensure their future sustainable use.

Conclusions

An integrated approach to management of marine and coastal resources should be introduced. At the institutional level, overlapping functions and responsibilities of government agencies inhibit improvements in marine management, resulting in restricted implementation of some policies and recommendations.

It may be necessary to reform or reallocate responsibilities among the agencies involved in coastal resource management; revise existing plans, laws, and regulations; and mobilize gender and community participation.

See also:
World Coral Reef Conference 2014 site

Contents 

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction
  • Biophysical Characteristics
  • Governance
  • Socioeconomic Characteristics
  • Threats and Vulnerabilities
  • National Plan of Action Initiatives and Future Plans
  • Conclusions and Recommendations
  • References