Papua New Guinea: HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control in Rural Development Enclaves | Asian Development Bank

Papua New Guinea: HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control in Rural Development Enclaves

Evaluation Document | 14 December 2017

In pursuing an export-driven economic growth, the Government of Papua New Guinea had established “development enclaves”, such as mines, plantations, and logging sites, in rural areas. These discrete centers of economic activity generated jobs and a cash economy contrasting with the subsistence farming of the surrounding rural populations. Such conditions were unfortunately ideal to foster the exchange of goods and cash-for-sex between workers in the development enclaves and the surrounding populations, transforming the enclaves into potential HIV/AIDS “hotspots.” Poverty, lack of information, and stigma were the major risk factors that could facilitate the spread of HIV. In communities, HIV/AIDS projects were implemented through civil society organizations most of which were small and lacked capacity, except for a few faith-based ones. Private economic operators in provinces were willing to help but required assistance. 

At the request of the government, ADB approved a $15.0 million grant to help develop public-private partnerships to prevent the spread of HIV around the rural enclaves. The project was implemented from 2006 until 2016, and a project completion report was prepared in April 2017. This report validates the project completion report assessment. IED overall assessment: Successful