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Affordable Rural Homes Provide Women in Uzbekistan with Stability and Access to Finance

Video | 7 June 2019

Affordable homes in Uzbekistan's rural areas are providing local women with security and stability, as well as helping them develop relations of trust with commercial banks that provide them with both mortgages and business loans.

From 2011 to 2015, Uzbekistan received $500 million in loans from ADB to help build over 41,000 houses for moderate and lower-income rural residents. Women became the registered owners of over 4,300 houses — 26% of the total. This is a positive achievement in rural Uzbekistan, where homes are usually registered in a man’s name.

Improving living conditions, creating livelihood opportunities, and providing jobs in rural areas are priorities for ADB in Uzbekistan.

Transcript

Uzbekistan - These new houses were built in rural areas of Uzbekistan with support from the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

Improving rural living conditions, creating livelihood opportunities, and providing jobs are priorities for ADB in this country.

From 2011to 2015, Uzbekistan received $500 million in loans from ADB to help build over 41,000 houses for moderate and lower-income rural residents.  

The project promoted the development of diverse sectors of the economy including banking, construction, and the production of building materials and home appliances.

Because gender equality is one of ADB’s operational priorities, the project had a special focus on women beneficiaries.

Now these beautiful new houses provide a stable future for their owners.  Behind their walls, we can see some inspiring stories.

When Shakhnoza Abidova applied for a housing loan, the concept of a mortgage loan was new, even for her colleagues in Asaka Bank where she worked.

“Now my house has all utilities.  There are no shortages in the supply of gas, electricity, and water,"  says Shakhnoza Abidova, an entrepreneur from the Ferghana region.  

“I am using air conditioning, washing machine, and refrigerator without any problems.“

“In the cold days of winter, we are enjoying our warm life inside.”  

“Also, we are paying back our loans using our salaries which are exempted from taxes.”

The need to repay her loan led Shakhnoza to the idea of starting her own business.  

“I wondered how I can have additional income. Then I decided to open a traditional bakery and confectionery,” she continues.

“Now I have four apprentices.  I am training these girls and ensuring their employment.”

The project aimed to promote equal rights for women and men.

From 2012 to 2015, women became the registered owners of over 4,300 houses—26% of them.  This is a positive achievement in Uzbekistan, where rural houses are usually registered in a man’s name.

Ravshanoy and her husband decided to sell their old house and take out a mortgage loan to buy a new house.

Ravshanoy and her family previously lived in a house without sewage and suffered from constant water and gas shortages.

“I was invited to a meeting in the town hall,” says Said Ravshanoy Matyakubova, a teacher from the Khorezm region.

“There was a gathering hosted by representatives of the bank and the Women’s Committee.”

“They talked about a new type of rural housing.”

 “And I was informed that I would have higher priority, as I am a teacher.”

Every day, she spent two hours just to heat water.  Now she has enough time to do gardening which she loves very much.

The project has improved the quality of life for more than 180,000 people.

The project has enabled women to develop relations of trust with commercial banks which provide both mortgage loans and small business loans.

New houses provide security and stability to these women.

Now they are more confident in their brighter futures, as their dreams are coming true.