ADB worked with a mother with three children to visually document their journey as a family from their home in the ger area to school, and to other places.  The visual journey maps shaped the design of the project’s safety features across seasons.

The family's journey map is among the community stories that the project generated to help ADB and the government to design infrastructure improvements, and address road user behavior through feedback mechanisms and bus driver training.

The community stories increased the stake of villagers to co-create safe neighborhoods they want to live in. 

The grant fund for the MON Improving Transport Services in Ger Areas was received from the Japan Fund for Prosperous and Resilient Asia and the Pacific financed by the Government of Japan through the Asian Development Bank.

Transcript

Chingeltei District, Mongolia

Road-related deaths and serious injuries are critical public health issues, particularly for pedestrians and other vulnerable road users.

In 2018, the World Health Organization reported that 29% of road traffic deaths involved pedestrians. 

ADB’s project on Improving Transport Services in Ger Areas used visual journey maps to understand the way families travel in both the summer and the winter, to address the safety concerns of vulnerable road users.

These shaped the design of the project’s safety features across seasons.  

Uzmee Khurtsbaatar, 44 years old

I walk them to their school in the morning and pick them up in the afternoon. 

We have no other choice but to walk on the road.  

Streets in the ger areas are very slippery in winter, and muddy in summer.

There should be barriers on roadsides  because children have high risk of running onto the road. 

Slippery road conditions make it even more dangerous if a child were to run in front of an approaching car.

Children do not always take a bus. They walk most of the time.

They will ride a public bus if it is too cold or too windy. 

During peak hours, buses are usually full of passengers, so they do not take children.

A proper bus shelter would be a refuge from the cold for children.

We should analyze the frequently used exits and entrances, then put stairs where necessary.

It could be beneficial for the elderly, people with bad legs, and children.

Community stories helped ADB and the government to design infrastructure improvements such as speed cushions to slow traffic in areas with heavy pedestrian activity while allowing smooth bus flow, zebra crossings with signage at key points to alert road users to pedestrians, weather-resistant footpaths, handrails, ramps and stairs in strategic areas bus bays and weather-protected bus shelters. 

Community stories will help the project address road user behaviors through customer feedback mechanisms and bus driver training.

A community council was formed for school training, public awareness campaigns, and to utilize grant projects so villagers themselves increase their stake in road safety and community well being.

Community journey maps gave direct input into the project’s design, to co-create safe neighborhoods they want to live in.

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