Seventy percent of the population by 2050 will be living in urban areas. Sixty percent of those urban areas have not yet been built.

Water is a finite resource. With global demand continuing to grow and the effect of climate change disrupting traditional water supplies, it is imperative to reimagine the way water is used, treated, and distributed. It is essential to develop environmentally sustainable circular water economies that are fit for 21st century societies.

Join Newsha Ajami, Chief Development Officer for Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, and other world experts at ADB’s flagship water event, the Asia Water Forum 2022, to discuss the most pressing issues facing water in the Asia and the Pacific region: awf.adb.org

Transcript

Hello, my name is Newsha Ajami, and I'm the Chief Development Officer for Research at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. I will be speaking at the Asia Water Forum this August.

We urgently need to rethink the way we use, treat, and distribute water. Water is a finite resource. And with global water demand continuing to grow, we have to reimagine the way we manage our water resources.

The linear water system that we depend on actually lends itself to a mindless consumption. We have disconnected people from where their water comes from, and where it goes.

We also have created these systems that are not very efficient. For example, we bring water to people's homes in a high drinkable quality, then that water is used to flush down toilets or water outdoor spaces.

In many ways we have to rethink how we use water and make sure we are using it wisely and efficiently. To do that, we have to rethink this linear system and try to make it more circular.

Seventy percent of the population by 2050 will be living in urban areas. Sixty percent of those urban areas have not yet been built. So imagine, we have so many opportunities to rethink and reimagine how we design and build this buildings.

For far too long we have taken our water supplies for granted. But with demand continuing to increase and the effect of climate change disrupting traditional water supplies, it is essential that we develop environmentally sustainable circular water economies that are fit for 21st century societies.

Join me at the Asia Water Forum this August to discuss these issues further.

END CREDITS

SHARE THIS PAGE