Just over 20% of Bangladesh's 34 million urban residents are poor. The Asian Development Bank, the Government of Sweden, and the United Nations Population Fund are supporting efforts to help urban local governments partner with non-governmental organizations and the private sector to deliver primary healthcare services in poor urban communities.

Transcript

Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Over 169 million people live in Bangladesh. The urban population is 34 million, with 7 million of them poor.

The Asian Development Bank, the Government of Sweden, and United Nations Population Fund are supporting a project to deliver primary healthcare services to poor urban communities.

The program started in 1998, and it is now serving people in 14 cities and municipalities.

Lucky is a street vendor living in a Dhaka slum. Earning around $4 a day, she can barely afford hospital treatment.

SOT: Lucky
Street vendor
"There is a satellite clinic where I live. After my pregnancy, I did a health check up there. They gave me a red card. My baby and I now get free health services."

SOT: Dr. Razia Akter
Medical consultant
"We run satellite clinics in slums six days a week. People get vaccinated and learn about family planning and health. Critical patients are brought directly to the clinic. Consulting a doctor is free of charge. We also carry out caesarean deliveries. We charge a minimal fee for laboratory tests."

SOT: Masuda Begum
Director health and Project Manager, Nari Maitree
"We secured this project through international competitive bidding. We are partnering with the government through a public-private partnership arrangement. The project serves red card holders free of charge. We also provide ambulatory services."

SOT: Md. Abu Bakr Sidduque
Project Director
"The project's main objective is to improve the health of urban poor, particularly of women and children. This is a unique public-private partnership model. We are delivering our services in partnership with NGOs."

This project has brought hope to the people we serve, encouraging them to remain healthy and improve their living standards.

Urban poor now know where to go for emergency, as well as regular healthcare services.

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