The rapid growth of the People’s Republic of China has led to an 8% to 10% annual increase in municipal solid waste, making it the world's second largest generator of solid waste. The People’s Republic of China produces 220 million tons annually. Solid waste poses not only environmental challenges for but also competes with human beings for space. With advanced technology, municipal solid waste is no longer a problem in the city of Suzhou, People's Republic of China. Waste-to-energy plant built by China Everbright International with ADB's financial support reduces volume of waste by 90% and produces enough energy to support over 55,000 households annually.

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Project Page: 43901-014: Municipal Waste to Energy Project

Transcript

Title: Burning Waste Produces Energy in the People’s Republic of China

Description: Municipal solid waste is no longer a problem in the city of Suzhou, People's Republic of China, thanks to a clean household waste-to-energy plant built by ADB in partnership with China Everbright International.

VO: China’s rapid growth has led to an 8% to 10% annual increase in municipal solid waste. Making China the world's second largest generator of solid waste, producing 220 million tons annually. Trading solid waste has become a challenge for many cities.

Everyday Pao and her two co workers clean the historic Shantang Street, one of the most famous streets in Suzhou, China. She is part of a community network that collects trash to keep Suzhou clean. Municipal garbage trucks collect the waste and take them to the Suzhou Household Waste to Energy Plant, 100% of the city's waste is processed here. The plant’s generators can burn up to 3,500 tons of municipal waste daily. This produces 350 million kwh of electricity annually which is used for lighting homes and businesses.

SOT: Wu Kai
General Manager
Suzhou Household Waste to Energy Plant
Incineration can reduce waste volume by 90% and weight by 80%. Using landfill as a waste disposal alternative compared to incineration waste land resources.

VO: After incineration the liquid and slug residue are safely treated and recycled. The Waste to Energy Plant was developed by China Everbright International and funded by the Asian Development Bank.

SOT: Hisaka Kimura
Head of Private Sector Infrastructure Finance
East Asia
Asian Development Bank
This is our private partnership for waste management. We are very excited to having larger partnership. Together with private sector, local government and also commercial banks, we strongly believe that we can restructure traditional and deliver much needed changes in this important sector.

VO: Walking in any of the WTE plant, you hardly believe that the plant has anything to do with garbage. With the support of ADB, the efforts of the municipal government and the deployment of advanced waste to energy technology, Pao and her co-workers will continue to play a major role in keeping the Shantang Street clean and charming for the next 1000 years.

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