New Airport Terminal Puts Philippine City of Cebu on the International Tourism Map | Asian Development Bank

New Airport Terminal Puts Philippine City of Cebu on the International Tourism Map

Video | 15 November 2018

A new terminal building in the Mactan-Cebu airport, is helping the city of Cebu in the Philippines position itself as a domestic and international tourism hub.

Covering an area of around 65,500 square meters, the world class facility hosts 26 airlines that fly to both international and domestic destinations. The new terminal aims to serve 11.2 million passengers by end of 2018.

The construction of the new facility is part of a public-private partnership (PPP) program supported by the Asian Development Bank. 

PPPs are a major part of the Philippine government’s agenda, which advocates a “build, build, build” program under which major infrastructure projects are built to encourage investments, create jobs, and help people and goods move faster.

Transcript

Cebu, Central Philippines - This is where Terminal 2 of the Mactan-Cebu International Airport was built 4 years ago.

The new terminal was inaugurated in July 2018.

Covering an area of around 65,500 square meters, the world class facility hosts 26 airlines that fly to both international and domestic destinations.

The airport in Cebu used to have only one terminal and it was unable to cater to the growing number of passengers and flights.

So, a second terminal had to be built.

Terminal 2 aims to boost Cebu’s connectivity and position it as a domestic and international hub.

The new terminal aims to serve 11.2 million passengers by end of 2018.

Tourists traveling to Cebu say the new terminal brings so many benefits.

“My wife is from the Visayas,” says David Williams, a tourist from the US.

“So, we can bypass Manila entirely, come directly here, stay with her cousin here in Cebu. It’s wonderful.”

This is an opinion shared by many.

We save money, we save time, it means you can get to your connecting flight, because we have to go back to Singapore to get to the UK,” tourist Kelsey Goldstein says.

Fellow traveler Katie Driver shares her sentiment.

“Because we’ve been traveling around, we’ve been in like the central Philippines, so it’s easy,” says Driver.

“It saves us an extra trip back to Manila to fly out again.”

The construction of the new facility is part of a public-private partnership (PPP) program

supported by the Asian Development Bank.

Under PPPs, the government invites private companies to build and operate projects.

“ADB’s private sector has been working with the Philippines on PPP for years,” says Michael Peter Barrow, Director General of ADB’s Private Sector Operations Department.

“More recently, we helped finance a project a little bit further south, down in Cebu, an airport project,” he continues.

“Even before we came in, our public sector colleagues were working with the government through a technical assistance program to help design and prepare the project for private sector engagement. And then the project was successfully bid. And they invited us to be part of the financing solution,” Barrow says.

“The Philippines, although many people don’t realize it, is one of the earlier pioneers in PPPs, particularly in the power sector, and we’ve done quite a bit, including recently, we financed what was then the largest wind power farm in Southeast Asia, here in the Philippines, called Burgos wind,” concludes Barrow.

PPPs are a major part of the Philippine government’s agenda.

The government advocates a “build, build, build” program.

It seeks to build major infrastructure projects to encourage investments, create jobs, and help people and goods move faster.