Residents of some of Georgia’s largest cities, Kutaisi and Zugdidi, now have 24-hour water supply after decades of having to rely on wells, water tanks, and pumping equipment. Sewage treatment plants have also been constructed to reduce environmental harm and improve sanitation using modern technologies.

Under ADB’s $500 million Urban Services Improvement Investment Program, modern water infrastructure is being built and rehabilitated in 13 cities and towns around Georgia.

ADB is also helping reform the operational and financial management of the United Water Supply Company of Georgia to ensure it can continue providing safe and reliable water services. Improved water services and sanitation systems will provide better opportunities for its residents and contribute to Georgia’s economic development.

Transcript

Kutaisi, Georgia

In one of the world’s oldest cities, residents have never experienced having 24-hour running water – until now.

A project by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) helped build extensive modern water infrastructure in Kutaisi, improving the lives of its 200,000 residents.

Davit Lolua, Car Wash Service Owner:

“Irregular water supply caused me problems. I had to buy water, fill up tanks and it was very expensive. Now, when we have 24-hour water supply I work freely and I pay less for water.”

Zugdidi, Georgia

In the city of Zugdidi, residents used to depend on wells, pumps and water tanks.

Now, the availability of round-the-clock safe, running water is making residents’ lives easier.

Medea Tsirgava, Housekeeper, Guesthouse Owner:

“When we had water shortages, we used to run back and forth, working two pumps to make the water reach the second floor. It cost us money and I had a lot of hassle. Now we are comfortable, as we have running water all the time.”

Under ADB’s $500 million Urban Services Improvement Program, modern water infrastructure is being built and rehabilitated in 11 other cities and towns.

Sewage treatment plants have also been constructed to reduce environmental harm and improve sanitation.

Murman Katsitadze, Associate Procurement Officer, Asian Development Bank:

“11 wastewater treatment plants will be built around Georgia. The treatment plants will clean sewage water mechanically and biologically. Biological treatment was never practiced in Georgia before and the Asian Development Bank is the first donor to introduce it in the country.”

Aleksandre Tevdoradze, Director, United Water Supply Company of Georgia:

“Zugdidi residents now have 24-hour water supply and the completed wastewater treatment plant will biologically treat water to have the clean water flow into the river. This is very important for the environment.”

ADB is also helping reform the operational and financial managementof the United Water Supply Company of Georgia toensure it can continue providing safe and reliable water services.

Shane Rosenthal, Country Director, Georgia Resident Mission, Asian Development Bank:

“It’s very important for cities to have this kind of service. To be able to attract investors in your city, to be able to attract tourists, you need to have this kind of modernized services, and Georgia has made some real strides ahead with this project.”

With improved water services and sanitation systems, better opportunities are flowing for thousands of Georgians.

SHARE THIS PAGE