Strengthening Indonesia’s City-Level COVID-19 Responses Using Digital Technology

Video | 11 August 2020

Local governments and utility companies are utilizing new approaches to manage the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. In the Indonesian City of Makassar, digital technology allowed officials to map out the spread of the virus and overlay this with geospatial data related to population density, poverty and access to basic service. This in turn enabled them to effectively mobilize their community, especially those within the identified pandemic hotspots. This approach, combined with the use of protective equipment and disinfection, helped to reduce the spread of the virus.

ADB has been working with the city of Makassar on projects related to slum alleviation and the improvement of wastewater management. Through the ASEAN Australia Smart Cities Trust Fund, ADB and the Australian Government are able to support cities throughout Southeast Asia in improving their service delivery, planning and financing using digital and smart technologies. Learn more about AASCTF (https://bit.ly/31eG7Lj) and follow the discussions and project update on the AASCTF social media platforms.

Transcript

Narrator: During the COVID-19 pandemic, across Asia national governments have reacted swiftly to support citizen’s safety and livelihoods. Local governments and utility companies have developed new approaches to cope with emergency situations. In Makassar a quick local response involving the use of protective equipment and disinfection reduced the spread of the disease.

Dr. Andi Hadijah Irani R., BAPPEDA Kota Makassar: “In regards to health protocol, all stakeholders in the city of Makassar are involved, including at the neighborhood level. That shows the beginning of how the whole community mobilized. This resulted in, that our COVID-19 reproduction number is now down to 1.9, which means that 1 person can only transmit 2 people.”

Narrator: During COVID-19 Makassar has been, testing new technology to analyze the spread of the virus to support emergency planning. The Future Cities Lab developed a tool to show the spread of the virus in Makassar. Data collected from mobile emergency units were plotted on a digital map to identify pandemic hotspots. Pandemic hotspots coincided with high population density. The pandemic developed fast in areas with slum and low access to clean water.

Dr. Ibu Virgi, BAPPENAS Indonesia: “We used this technology, at least to get data and educate the people, do the campaign and so on. We really need this technology because we cannot interact physically with others. I think at the city level we need to have a good comprehensive smart city plan.”

Narrator: The city of Makassar aims to become a smart and livable city. Through the years ADB has worked with the city of Makassar on projects related to slum alleviation and the improvement of wastewater management. Through the ASEAN Australia Smart Cities Trust Fund, we, together with the Australian government are able to support cities throughout Southeast Asia improving their service delivery, planning and financing using digital and smart technologies. Activities of the trust fund may focus on how cities can better engage with citizens in private sector, and how to improve inclusion and accountability.