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Urban Services for Mongolia's Booming Border Towns

Video | 15 May 2019

Rapid growth in mining and cross-border trade is putting a strain on existing infrastructure in Mongolia's South Gobi region, an area famous for its wild nature, nomadic culture, and rich mineral deposits.

The Government with support from the Asian Development Bank is now working to improve urban infrastructure and services.

Transcript

South Gobi, Mongolia - A region famous for its wild nature, nomadic culture, and rich mineral deposits.

Rapid growth in mining and cross-border trade, however, is putting a strain on the region’s booming towns.

The Government of Mongolia with ADB support is now working to improve urban infrastructure and services.

“Now that our school is connected to sewer pipes, we are not distracted by the smell of the pit hole toilets and can study in a pleasant environment,” says Ganzul Gansukh, a seventh grade student from Zamyn-Uud School #2.

Four water reservoirs and 39 km of water supply pipelines have been built.

More than 3,000 children in three secondary schools now have access to tap water.

More than 200 households have connections to water supply pipelines.

And 24-hour smart water kiosks are now operating in the region’s towns.

“Residents used to spend a long time in queues at water kiosks that only operated for 8 hours a day,” explains Aldarbayar Naidan, Governor of the Zamyn-Uud district.

“Now, thanks to the new smart water kiosks, people have 24-hour-a-day access, they can collect water whenever they need it. Connection to the permanent water supply network gives the households an opportunity to live a comfortable life.”

“I used to go to the water kiosk. Now, I can get water right at a wall in my home and life is better,” says Norjinlkham Urtnasan, Resident of Zamyn-Uud district.

“Water costs about 2,000 tugrugs a month. Before, I could barely get 100 liters of water with that amount, so it’s very cost effective.”

Wastewater plants and 31 km of sewers were built in six provincial towns.

Solid waste management has also improved.

Heating supply pipelines and boiler houses were upgraded to meet high demand in winter.

“The project has already helped 75,000 people and that number could grow 125,000 in the future. Local contractors have done all the civil works,” explains Tuul Badarch, a senior project officer from ADB’s Mongolia Resident Mission.

Road upgrades have cut dust, noise pollution, and the number of car accidents.

Living conditions have rapidly improved in this remote region that an increasing number of Mongolians call home.