44129-012: Developing Sustainable Alternative Livelihoods in Coastal Fishing Communities in the Coral Triangle: Indonesia and Philippines | Asian Development Bank

Regional: Developing Sustainable Alternative Livelihoods in Coastal Fishing Communities in the Coral Triangle: Indonesia and Philippines

Sovereign (Public) Project | 44129-012 Status: Active

The goal of the project is to raise the income levels of the the poor coastal communities in Berau, East Kalimantan, Indonesia and Balabac, Palawan, Philippines by pilot-testing support mechanisms for sustainable livelihoods . The objective of the Project is to develop model alternative livelihoods that will involve women and indigenous people in the development process.

The components will include:

A. Social Preparation that support the following activities: (i) poverty assessment to identify specific project sites and potential beneficiaries, particularly very poor fishers, women, and indigenous peoples in the target coastal communities; (ii) social preparation to improve the attitude of target beneficiaries from mere recipients of government aid to managers of their own livelihoods; (iii) organization and training of beneficiaries in business and financial management; and (iv) participatory planning in selecting business enterprises and the conduct of feasibility studies.

Project Details

Project Officer
Matsuda, Hideki Southeast Asia Department Request for information
Country
  • Regional
Modality
  • Grant
 
Project Name Developing Sustainable Alternative Livelihoods in Coastal Fishing Communities in the Coral Triangle: Indonesia and Philippines
Project Number 44129-012
Country Regional
Project Status Active
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Grant
Source of Funding / Amount
Grant 9160-REG: Developing Sustainable Alternative Livelihoods in Coastal Fishing Communities in the Coral Triangle: Indonesia and Philippines
Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction US$ 2.00 million
Strategic Agendas Environmentally sustainable growth
Inclusive economic growth
Drivers of Change Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
Partnerships
Sector / Subsector

Agriculture and Natural Resources / Agriculture, natural resources and rural development

Gender Equity and Mainstreaming Some gender elements
Description

The goal of the project is to raise the income levels of the the poor coastal communities in Berau, East Kalimantan, Indonesia and Balabac, Palawan, Philippines by pilot-testing support mechanisms for sustainable livelihoods . The objective of the Project is to develop model alternative livelihoods that will involve women and indigenous people in the development process.

The components will include:

A. Social Preparation that support the following activities: (i) poverty assessment to identify specific project sites and potential beneficiaries, particularly very poor fishers, women, and indigenous peoples in the target coastal communities; (ii) social preparation to improve the attitude of target beneficiaries from mere recipients of government aid to managers of their own livelihoods; (iii) organization and training of beneficiaries in business and financial management; and (iv) participatory planning in selecting business enterprises and the conduct of feasibility studies.

B. Livelihood Development and Implementation that support the establishment and development of financially sustainable and ecosystem-friendly livelihood activities; and livelihood support mechanisms for the provision of (i) technical services; (ii) production, post-harvest, and processing of inputs; (iii) financial facilitation services; and (iv) marketing information and services; v) a production profit- and risk-sharing system among project participants (NGOs, the private sector, and beneficiaries); vi) a marketing system to assist target beneficiaries to access wider markets and required market facilities; and vii) a program to mobilize savings from capital build up and profits from the livelihood activities of project beneficiaries to fund the growth of existing livelihoods of beneficiaries and expand the number of beneficiaries. This component will also include an Enterprise Skills Traning Program that will develop the technical and managerial skills of beneficiaries.

Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy The development of sustainable alternative livelihoods to reduce poverty in coastal communities in Indonesia and the Philippines was identified as a priority action by the National Coordinating Committees (NCCs) of these countries under their respective National Plans of Action (NPOAs) of the Coral Triangle Initiative: Coral Reefs, Fisheries, and Food Security (CTI). The Project will contribute towards meeting country commitments to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It is also consistent with the Asian Development Bank's (ADB) Strategy 2020: The Long-Term Strategic Framework for 2008 - 2020, its vision of an Asia and Pacific free of poverty, and its mission to help reduce poverty and improve living conditions and quality of life. The Project likewise falls within ADB's core areas of operation in scaling up environmentally sustainable development and addressing climate change.
Impact The Project is expected to result in the improved status of coastal and marine ecosystems and resources and the increased climate change resiliency of coastal communities in identified sites in the Sulu-Sulawesi Marine Ecoregion in Indonesia and the Philippines. Effective environmental management will be in place in 20-30% of coastal and marine ecosystems in selected sites by 2012. The improved status of mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and coral reefs will reduce the vulnerability of coastal habitats and communities to storms and coastal erosion impacts, and serve as the first line of defense of communities vulnerable to climate change.
Project Outcome
Description of Outcome The Project is intended to provide coastal communities in East Kalimantan, Indonesia and Balabac Islands, Philippines with sustainable alternative livelihoods that will enable them to rise above the poverty line by the end of the three-year implementation period.
Progress Toward Outcome The project management system is in place through building capacities of the local government unit, project staff, and the executing agency staff. Work plans were submitted to ADB. The executing agency and consulting firm did participatory monitoring and evaluation and impact assessments, with at least one project knowledge product disseminated through media. ADB review missions were done for Philippines and Indonesia in March 2018 and April 2018, respectively.
Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

Targeted beneficiaries in coastal communities in Berau District and Balabac trained to develop business plans for livelihoods

Viable livelihoods successfully implemented by organized coastal community groups

Effective project management system operational

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)

Output 1

Indonesia component:

(i) prepared the website; (ii) prepared coastal community group proposals used as basis of business plans; (iii) discussed a dissemination plan (e.g. web-site, flyers, video and a book) to share knowledge and lessons; (iv) M&E specialist was recruited to prepare M&E reports, and (v) prepared quarterly progress reports.

Philippines' component:

(i) highlighted the participatory process of selection criteria development, project sites description, and 275 household beneficiaries, of which 34.5% (95) are women {In Q1 2018, households increased to 289, where 61% (175) are led by males, and 39% (114) are led by females. In Q2 2018, training was expanded to include 120 households from the other 4 barangays}; (ii) reinstated the information, education and communication/knowledge management specialist to finish the knowledge products by project completion; (iii) submitted the identified list of potential livelihoods; (iv) identified the 40 target beneficiaries; (v) completed the socio-economic and poverty assessment in 6-7 project sites; (vi) 6-7 coastal villages were identified as project sites and 250 households as potential direct beneficiaries; (vii) 409 community livelihood partners from the 12 barangays, where 54% (220) are males, and 46% (189) are females; (viii) 19 community clusters were consolidated into one federation names as Kasombilugan Bangsa Molbog; (ix) 4 livelihood programs were selected for the packaging of prototype enterprises; (x) developed knowledge products and training manuals; (xi) conducted an information education campaign.

Output 2

Indonesia component:

(i) Coordinated with related agencies and partners (e.g. GIZ, the Embassy of US America in Indonesia (Millennium Challenge Account), Forum Lingkungan Mulawarman on livelihood skills training and product marketability; (ii) identified 10 alternative livelihood modules in 4 categories: (a) fish processed products, (b) shrimp paste, and (c) small enterprises and (d) payment of ecosystem services through public consultation since 2014; (iii) conducted business plan training; and (iv) established 48 alternative livelihood units, of which 33 or 69% will be led by women.

Philippines' component:

(i) identified livelihood support mechanisms including business planning; (ii) conducted enterprise skills training program for the beneficiaries; (iii) partnership with the private sector; (iv) ongoing program to mobilize savings from capital build up and profits from beneficiaries' livelihoods; (v) ongoing monitoring and evaluation; (vi) conducted skills training for welding, masonry, handicrafts/weaving, small ruminants, poultry (meat, layer); (vii) launched a demo farm in the Balabac National High School, piloting the livelihood modules; (viii) selected 42 households as pilot trials for the microenterprises, where 26 households are women-led, with business plans drafted; (ix) 275 livelihood partners underwent training on the livelihood modules; and (x) expanded to other 4 barangays and 120 partners.

Output 3

Indonesia component:

(i) conducted site visits and validation surveys; (ii) selected project sites (villages) of 8 villages in 2 sub-districts and targeted 264 livelihood direct beneficiaries; (iii) conducted enterprise skills development training activities (production skills, group management, book keeping, marketing, PIRT(certification for food processing); and (iv) prepared 49 business plans for enterprises of 10 modules in 4 categories (fish processed products (22 business plans), fish crackers (13), floss (4), fish balls (2), drying/salt fish (3), shrimp paste (1), small enterprises (19), fish trade(1), souvenirs production and sales (9), caf management in mangrove area (1), rental shop management (8), dinghy (1), snorkeling gears (6), bicycle (1), and payment for ecosystem service (7), mangrove forest trekking routes management (1), seagrass conservation (3), coral reef replantation (1), information centers (2) to showcase knowledge products on the project, ecosystem and villages); and (v) completed the gender action plan.

Philippines' component:

Submission of (i) yearly comprehensive work plans; (ii) quarterly progress reports; (iii) monthly newsletters; (iv) implementation schedule; (v) various reports; (vi) gender action plan; and (vii) paralegal training for wildlife enforcement officers.

Geographical Location Regional
Safeguard Categories
Environment C
Involuntary Resettlement C
Indigenous Peoples C
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects
Involuntary Resettlement
Indigenous Peoples
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design

Discussions at the national level were conducted with the representatives of relevant units in MMAF in Indonesia (i.e. Planning Bureau, External Cooperation, Directorate of Community Empowerment and Directorate of National Marine Parks) and the different sections of District Marine Affairs and Fisheries Office in Berau at the local level (including Coasts and Small Islands, Law Enforcement, Aquaculture and Post-Harvest). Representatives from the Directorates of Community Empowerment and the National Marine Parks joined the field trips during project preparation, together with the of head of the Fishers Forum of Berau and the head of Law Enforcement unit of the District Marine Affairs and Fisheries Office. Meetings were also conducted with the joint program of The Nature Conservancy (TNC) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF).

In Balabac Philippines, consultations were conducted with the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development Staff (PCSDS), the head of the Center for Strategic Policy and Governance of Palawan State University, the mayor of Balabac and his municipal development officer, municipal agricultural officer, and municipal social works and development officer (MSWDO). Female government officials, both at the national and local levels, who are involved in the empowerment of women joined the field trips, such as the representative of the Directorate of Community Empowerment of the Directorate General of Marine, Coasts, and Small Islands (DGMCSI) in Indonesia and the MSWDO of Balabac. Consultations were also made with local fishers, traders, village officials, and Molbog leaders from several target communities, wherein several village women, mostly engaged in processing, were also involved in the discussions.

During Project Implementation

For the PHI component, the consulting firm started in March 2015. The Project (i) met with possible project partners on pearl hatchery, and (ii) discussed with related agencies and project partners on livelihood skills training and product marketability. The team discussed with related agencies and project partners on livelihood skills training and product marketability. The team also interacted with target barangays, government agencies in the field, and people's organizations.The project implementation is bottom-up through participatory assessments and inputs from the communities.

For the INO component, the project management consulting firm mobilized in June 2016. The Project (i) conducted focus group discussions in the project areas, (ii) conceptualized the project details based on current circumstances, (iii) conducted socialization on activities, and (iv) trained coastal community groups for community development.

The project implementation is bottom-up through participatory assessments and inputs from the communities.

Business Opportunities
Consulting Services tbd
Procurement tbd
Responsible ADB Officer Matsuda, Hideki
Responsible ADB Department Southeast Asia Department
Responsible ADB Division Environment, Natural Resources & Agriculture Division, SERD
Executing Agencies
Ministry of Marine Affairs & Fisheries
Indonesia
Palawan Council For Sustainable Development Staff
3rd Floor, Victoria I Bldg.
1670 Quezon Avenue, Quezon City
Metro Manila, Philippines
Timetable
Concept Clearance 30 Aug 2011
Fact Finding 16 May 2010 to 28 May 2010
MRM -
Approval 02 Nov 2011
Last Review Mission -
PDS Creation Date 28 Jun 2010
Last PDS Update 27 Sep 2018

Grant 9160-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
02 Nov 2011 15 May 2012 15 May 2012 15 Nov 2015 15 Nov 2018 -
Financing Plan Grant Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 2.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 02 Nov 2011 0.00 1.05 52%
Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 2.00 02 Nov 2011 0.00 1.42 71%
Status of Covenants
Category Sector Safeguards Social Financial Economic Others
Rating - - - Satisfactory - Satisfactory

Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative.

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Safeguard Documents See also: Safeguards

Safeguard documents provided at the time of project/facility approval may also be found in the list of linked documents provided with the Report and Recommendation of the President.

None currently available.

Evaluation Documents See also: Independent Evaluation

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Related Publications

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Requests for information may also be directed to the InfoUnit.

Tenders

Tender Title Type Status Posting Date Deadline
Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist (Indonesia) Individual - Consulting Closed 19 May 2018 25 May 2018
Monitoring & Evaluation Specialist (Philippines) Individual - Consulting Closed 19 May 2018 25 May 2018

Contracts Awarded

No contracts awarded for this project were found

Procurement Plan

None currently available.