Regional : Civil Society Participation for Development Effectiveness

Sovereign Project | 47213-001

The impact of the TA will be strengthened development effectiveness resulting from greater CSO engagement. Increasing meaningful engagements among ADB, CSOs, and DMCs in ADB-financed projects will contribute to more projects completed with enhanced development results. Involving more CSOs in ADB-financed projects can help improve development outcomes and sustainability, contributing to fewer project issues and concerns, and more people participating in and benefiting from the development projects.

Project Details

  • Project Officer
    Morris, Christopher I.
    Sustainable Development and Climate Change Department
    Request for information
  • Country/Economy
    Regional
  • Modality
  • Sector
    • Information and communication technology
Project Name Civil Society Participation for Development Effectiveness
Project Number 47213-001
Country / Economy Regional
Project Status Closed
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Technical Assistance
Source of Funding / Amount
TA 8595-REG: Civil Society Participation for Development Effectivenesss
Technical Assistance Special Fund US$ 750,000.00
TA 8595-REG: Civil Society Participation for Development Effectiveness (Supplementary)
Technical Assistance Special Fund US$ 250,000.00
TA 8595-REG: Civil Society Participation for Development Effectiveness (Supplementary)
Technical Assistance Special Fund US$ 500,000.00
TA 8595-REG: Civil Society Participation for Development Effectiveness (Supplementary)
Technical Assistance Special Fund US$ 600,000.00
Strategic Agendas Inclusive economic growth
Drivers of Change Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
Governance and capacity development
Sector / Subsector

Information and communication technology / ICT strategy and policy, and capacity development

Water and other urban infrastructure and services / Urban policy, institutional and capacity development

Gender Some gender elements
Description

The impact of the TA will be strengthened development effectiveness resulting from greater CSO engagement. Increasing meaningful engagements among ADB, CSOs, and DMCs in ADB-financed projects will contribute to more projects completed with enhanced development results. Involving more CSOs in ADB-financed projects can help improve development outcomes and sustainability, contributing to fewer project issues and concerns, and more people participating in and benefiting from the development projects.

The outcome of the TA will be increased civil society contribution in ADB operations. Meaningful participation will be incorporated in country partnership strategies (CPSs) and project design and implementation. Indicators and targets for achievement are (i) all CPS and relevant sector assessments include civil society participation, increasing from the current baseline of 60% in 2013; (ii) all projects have inclusive stakeholder analysis; (iii) relevant projects have participation plan; and (iv) partnerships developed to expand youth contribution to the achievement of SDGs through ADB programs and projects.

Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy

CSOs were formally recognized internationally for the first time as independent development actors in their own right at the Third High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness at Accra in 2008. This was a significant advancement in situating the distinctive contributions of CSOs to development and making them essential partners in the development process. CSO participation in service delivery and advocating for development has contributed to meeting the global development objectives because of (i) the ability of CSOs to use social and mass media to mobilize dialogue and action for their causes, (ii) the extensive international and local reach of CSOs, and (iii) the agility and willingness of CSOs to take advantage of new trends and seek new and innovative ways to alleviate poverty.

ADB's Strategy 2020 identified partnerships as one of the five drivers of change, noting, 'Partnerships with international development agencies, multilateral and bilateral institutions, the private sector, NGOs, community-based organizations, and foundations will become central to planning, financing, and implementing ADB operations.

The Independent Evaluation Department of ADB consistently attributes a high value to civil society participation and the continuing need to strengthen and mainstream the participation of CSOs in ADB operations. ADB pursues cooperation with CSOs to (i) incorporate innovations, knowledge, and approaches in ADB services; (ii) strengthen effectiveness in delivering development results; and (iii) ensure sustainability of such results.

CSOs are insufficiently engaged by both ADB and ADB DMCs in development projects. Despite ADB's commitment to improve engagement and partnerships with stakeholders, some of its projects and programs have been subject to criticism from CSOs that have raised issues and concerns. Recent research revealed that about 60% of issues and concerns raised by CSOs on ADB projects were related to inadequate communication and participation. ADB perception surveys show that CSOs consistently rate ADB's performance below the average rating given by other non-CSO stakeholders responding to the survey, demonstrating they are more dissatisfied than these other groups. Moreover, DMCs tend to view CSOs as competitors in development, missing the opportunity to harness innovative, cost-effective, and inclusive practices. These reasons highlight the importance of improving civil society participation in program and project planning, design, and implementation.

The modality through which ADB harnesses NGO engagement depends on the broader context of government-CSO relations and entry points provided by ADB operations. Some of the challenges to facilitating better partnerships with CSOs include the following: (i) DMC clients and ADB staff lack the time, resources, or experience to engage with CSOs during project planning and design; (ii) there is a lack of perceived added value of CSO participation; (iii) insufficient outreach and mechanism to engage CSOs in knowledge sharing events; (iv) inadequate knowledge products and a need to increase consultation and participation activities with CSOs and DMCs; and (v) ADB does not utilize partnerships as effectively as it could.

The TA will address these challenges by mainstreaming and sustaining civil society participation in ADB operations through five outputs: (i) Output 1: innovative knowledge solutions generated and shared through engagement with CSOs and youth using online media, forums, conferences, and ADB's Annual Meeting; (ii) Output 2: expanded partnerships with CSOs to involve innovative youth participation in development; (iii) Output 3: enriched ADB-DMC-CSO relations through interaction and communication on projects, country development issues, and country programming; (iv) increased meaningful participation of civil society in projects and sectors; and (v) empowered and mobilized youth to contribute to the achievement of the SDGs.

Impact

Strengthened development effectiveness resulting from greater CSO engagement

Project Outcome
Description of Outcome

Increased civil society contribution to ADB operations

Progress Toward Outcome The core team of Youth for Asia (YfA), ADB's youth program, currently provides advice and support to operational project officers and PPTA teams on some 36 projects across water, sanitation, environment, transport, urban, education, and skills development projects in five operations departments and three knowledge departments. Partnerships have also brought knowledge and experience to ADB operations by strengthening civil society participation throughout Asia and the Pacific, and have helped ADB to have a better understanding of partnership development and management for improving partnership business processes.
Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

Innovative knowledge solutions generated and shared through engagement with CSOs and youth using online media, forums, conferences, and ADB's Annual Meeting

Expanded partnerships with CSOs to involve innovative youth participation in development

Enriched ADB-DMC-CSO relations through interaction and communication on projects, country development issues, and country programming

Increased meaningful participation of civil society in projects and sectors

Empowered and mobilized youth to contribute to the achievement of the SDGs

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)

Implementation of the TA has been progressing satisfactorily with no major issues or problems encountered. Disbursements are generally on schedule and it is anticipated that TA funds will be fully utilized under the TA activities.

Output 1: To date, the TA has facilitated the generation of innovative solutions and sharing of knowledge through active youth engagement in forums, conferences, and online platforms. Such events have helped strengthen youth-focused partnerships with DMC government agencies, ADB resident missions, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), UN and other youth-focused stakeholders and internally, with ADB sector and thematic groups (STGs) and ADB operations departments. Active social media platforms, supported by the TA, have provided a venue for knowledge exchange and dialogue contributing significantly to ADB's overall online presence. The TA has also fostered partnerships with a number of youth-focused CSOs and the private sector.

Output 2: The TA is supporting meaningful participation of youth in a growing number of ADB-financed projects. Roadmaps for youth participation in ADB projects have been prepared for the environment, governance, water, disaster risk management, education, and employment sectors working closely with ADB's sector and thematic groups. In providing support across the TA outputs, several cooperation agreements and/or knowledge partnership agreements have been forged with partner organizations. Partnership memorandums of understanding (MOUs) have been entered into for specific CSO or youth knowledge events, or to support operations, leveraging the resources of the TA.

Outputs 3 and 4: The TA supported work with ADB field offices to strengthen civil society engagement in the Pacific DMCs. The TA has also helped build capacity of CSOs to engage with ADB project operations more effectively for better development results. Workshops have been held in resident missions in the Central West Asia and the Pacific regions on CSO engagement with ADB. Knowledge events have also been held among government representatives and civil society to promote transparent and accountable governance.

Output 5: The TA supported ADB joining, as a founding member, the Youth for Global Goals (Y4GG) movement launched at the UN headquarters in New York City in December 2015. Under YfA support of Y4GG, ADB is providing strategic support to awareness, understanding, and youth action campaigns of AIESEC, a large youth-led organization, across Asia and the Pacific. Also, a SDG curriculum has been designed and tested under YfA and is being rolled-out under Y4GG. Over 5,000 youth have been mobilized through ADB projects and partnerships to support the SDGs across at least 20 countries and 500 universities in Asia and the Pacific. An examination and evaluation of the impact activities conducted by youth-led and youth-focused organizations in communities, and the development of evidence to evaluate the outcomes and potential impact of youth projects in the achievement of the SDGs has been undertaken with Plan International U.K.

Geographical Location Regional
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects
Involuntary Resettlement
Indigenous Peoples
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design
During Project Implementation
Business Opportunities
Consulting Services

The TA will mobilize and engage 12 person-months of individual international consultants and 47 person-months of individual national consultants. All consultants will be selected in accordance with ADB's Guidelines on the Use of Consultants (2013, as amended from time to time). All procurement will be done in accordance with ADB's Procurement Guidelines (2013 as amended from time to time). CSO anchors, CSO Cooperation Network members, the TA management team, and ADB staff from collaborating CoPs/projects will serve as resource persons for TA activities. Administrative support staff can conduct activities supported by the TA. TA funds may be used to support increased CSO participation in ongoing projects and preparatory TA.

Proceeds of the TA will be disbursed in accordance with ADB's Technical Assistance Disbursement Handbook (2010, as amended from time to time). Progress will be monitored using intended outcomes and outputs described in the design and monitoring framework.

Responsible ADB Officer Morris, Christopher I.
Responsible ADB Department Sustainable Development and Climate Change Department
Responsible ADB Division NGO and Civil Society Center
Executing Agencies
Asian Development Bank
Timetable
Concept Clearance 09 Oct 2013
Fact Finding -
MRM -
Approval 16 Dec 2013
Last Review Mission -
Last PDS Update 25 Sep 2017

TA 8595-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
16 Dec 2013 - 16 Dec 2013 31 Dec 2016 31 Oct 2017 14 Feb 2018
Financing Plan/TA Utilization Cumulative Disbursements
ADB Cofinancing Counterpart Total Date Amount
Gov Beneficiaries Project Sponsor Others
2,100,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2,100,000.00 17 Jun 2022 2,032,309.72

Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative.

The Access to Information Policy (AIP) recognizes that transparency and accountability are essential to development effectiveness. It establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced.

The Accountability Mechanism provides a forum where people adversely affected by ADB-assisted projects can voice and seek solutions to their problems and report alleged noncompliance of ADB's operational policies and procedures.

In preparing any country program or strategy, financing any project, or by making any designation of, or reference to, a particular territory or geographic area in this document, the Asian Development Bank does not intend to make any judgments as to the legal or other status of any territory or area.


Safeguard Documents See also: Safeguards
Safeguard documents provided at the time of project/facility approval may also be found in the list of linked documents provided with the Report and Recommendation of the President.

None currently available.


Evaluation Documents See also: Independent Evaluation

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Related Publications


The Access to Information Policy (AIP) establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced in its operations to facilitate stakeholder participation in ADB's decision-making. For more information, refer to the Safeguard Policy Statement, Operations Manual F1, and Operations Manual L3.

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Procurement Plan

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