fbpx 52103-001: Support for Inclusive Education Project | Asian Development Bank

Mongolia: Support for Inclusive Education Project

Sovereign (Public) Project | 52103-001 Status: Approved

Children with disabilities (CWD) benefit both academically and socio-emotionally from attending mainstream kindergartens and schools with their same-age peers. The project will improve access to and quality of mainstream education for CWD in Mongolia by improving accessibility features in selected mainstream schools and kindergartens; building capacity to deliver inclusive education; and strengthening inclusive education support resources, community engagement, and policy. The project has strong pro-poor, socially inclusive, and gender-sensitive features. The direct beneficiaries will be CWD and their families, especially women as the primary caregivers, but inclusive education also brings significant benefits to the wider community.

Project Details

Project Officer
Schelzig, Karin Mara East Asia Department Request for information
Country
  • Mongolia
Sector
  • Education
 
Project Name Support for Inclusive Education Project
Project Number 52103-001
Country Mongolia
Project Status Approved
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Grant
Source of Funding / Amount
Grant 9208-MON: Support for Inclusive Education
Japan Fund for Poverty Reduction US$ 2.00 million
Strategic Agendas Inclusive economic growth
Drivers of Change Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
Governance and capacity development
Knowledge solutions
Partnerships
Sector / Subsector

Education / Pre-primary and primary

Gender Equity and Mainstreaming Gender equity
Description Children with disabilities (CWD) benefit both academically and socio-emotionally from attending mainstream kindergartens and schools with their same-age peers. The project will improve access to and quality of mainstream education for CWD in Mongolia by improving accessibility features in selected mainstream schools and kindergartens; building capacity to deliver inclusive education; and strengthening inclusive education support resources, community engagement, and policy. The project has strong pro-poor, socially inclusive, and gender-sensitive features. The direct beneficiaries will be CWD and their families, especially women as the primary caregivers, but inclusive education also brings significant benefits to the wider community.
Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy

Persons with disabilities (PWD) in Mongolia face considerable challenges. Among households with one or more persons with disability, the poverty rate is more than double that of households with none. PWD are more likely to be poor because of physical, financial, and cultural barriers to education and skills development, and consequently to good jobs and other forms of social inclusion. Among Mongolian PWD of working age, fewer than one in five (19%) are employed, in stark contrast to working age people without disabilities, among whom nearly two-thirds (64%) are employed. According to Mongolia's National Program for the Rights, Protection, and Participation of PWD there were nearly 101,000 PWD in 2017. Estimates of the prevalence of CWD vary. The country's social protection database listed 11,244 CWD in 2018 but this is likely to be an underestimate of the number of children with functional difficulties as eligibility for social protection benefits requires a formal diagnosis.

Mongolia's 2016 Law on the Rights of PWD covers the right to education and specifies the duty of (i) schools to adapt to the needs of CWD, (ii) parents to enrol their children in school, and (iii) social workers to play an important intermediary role and provide information and support. However, boys and girls with disabilities remain excluded from quality mainstream education, and low educational attainment is a major source of vulnerability. Just 44% of CWD were enrolled in mainstream schools in 2010. School attendance is much lower for CWD than for children without disabilities, particularly in rural areas. There are also gender disparities boys' enrolment as a share of the total drops in higher grades, both in the general population and among CWD. Among CWD aged 6 18 years almost half are unable to read, whereas only 4% of those without disabilities are unable to read. Nearly two-thirds (64%) of CWD aged 3 5 years are not attending kindergarten, versus nearly one-third (32%) of children of the same age without disabilities. Women are the vast majority of primary caregivers for CWD not attending school. While the social assistance system provides an allowance for caregivers, the benefit level is low.

One out of every five Mongolian PWD has not completed any level of education, compared to fewer than 4% of the rest of the population. The root causes of the barriers to education for CWD include (i) limited physical access to schools primarily because of a lack of accessibility features in schools, difficulties in accessing adequate transportation, unmet demand for assistive devices, augmentative and alternative communication equipment, and other innovative technologies to support functionality, and a lack of inclusive education resource centers in schools; (ii) poor quality education for CWD given the lack of capacity among teachers at mainstream schools, insufficient teaching and learning materials, and an outdated curriculum; and (iii) inadequate community, school, and education department support for inclusive education due to negative parent and community attitudes, and a lack of understanding and capacity to support inclusive culture, policies, and practices at schools.

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Science, and Sports (MECSS) is committed to effecting a shift away from the current dual system of mainstream and special education to an inclusive one where all children, including CWD, can enjoy the right to quality education in an inclusive environment. The new ministerial order A292 of May 2019, Guidance on Inclusive Education of CWD, envisions that all schools will respect the rights of children with different needs to education and development and provide conditions for them to stay in mainstream or regular schools. The order sets out the principles and key activities of inclusive education, and mandates schools to establish (i) child development support classrooms either independently or shared among schools, and (ii) school support teams to provide coordinated development support services. The support teams will comprise the school director, the head of studies, the school social worker, the head of the primary teachers' unit, teachers, the school doctor, a representative from the khoroo (urban district), and a specialist from the local education department. The order includes a list of recommended equipment and supplies for the support classrooms.

The participation of civil society and especially disabled people's organizations (DPOs), is essential for planning, implementing, and monitoring inclusive education in Mongolia. Civil society consultations elicited views on challenges and priority issues in inclusive education, including the need to collaborate with parents to address discriminatory attitudes. DPOs highlighted (i) the importance of capacity building at the national and subnational levels on the approach of inclusion as opposed to integration (separate classrooms in mainstream schools) or segregation (separate schools), and (ii) the need to establish more resource centers to support teachers with teaching and learning resources.

Impact Equal participation of persons with disabilities without any discrimination in all aspects of life achieved
Project Outcome
Description of Outcome Access to and quality of education for boys and girls with disabilities improved
Progress Toward Outcome
Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

Accessibility features of mainstream schools and kindergartens improved

Capacity to deliver inclusive education enhanced

Inclusive education support resources, community engagement, and policy strengthened

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)
Geographical Location Nation-wide
Safeguard Categories
Environment C
Involuntary Resettlement C
Indigenous Peoples C
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects
Involuntary Resettlement
Indigenous Peoples
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design
During Project Implementation
Business Opportunities
Consulting Services The grant will finance small civil works, equipment, consulting services, training, and project management.
Responsible ADB Officer Schelzig, Karin Mara
Responsible ADB Department East Asia Department
Responsible ADB Division Urban and Social Sectors Division, EARD
Executing Agencies
Ministry of Education, Culture, Science & Sports
Government Building-III, Suite # 514, Baga toiruu-44, Sukhbaatar district
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Timetable
Concept Clearance 10 Jun 2019
Fact Finding 27 May 2019 to 05 Jun 2019
MRM -
Approval 03 Jul 2020
Last Review Mission -
Last PDS Update 05 Jul 2020

Grant 9208-MON

Financing Plan Grant Utilization
Total (Amount in US$ million) Date ADB Others Net Percentage
Project Cost 2.00 Cumulative Contract Awards
ADB 0.00 - 0.00 0.00 %
Counterpart 0.00 Cumulative Disbursements
Cofinancing 2.00 - 0.00 0.00 %

Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative.

The Access to Information Policy (AIP) recognizes that transparency and accountability are essential to development effectiveness. It establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced.

The Accountability Mechanism provides a forum where people adversely affected by ADB-assisted projects can voice and seek solutions to their problems and report alleged noncompliance of ADB's operational policies and procedures.

In preparing any country program or strategy, financing any project, or by making any designation of, or reference to, a particular territory or geographic area in this document, the Asian Development Bank does not intend to make any judgments as to the legal or other status of any territory or area.

Safeguard Documents See also: Safeguards

Safeguard documents provided at the time of project/facility approval may also be found in the list of linked documents provided with the Report and Recommendation of the President.

None currently available.

Evaluation Documents See also: Independent Evaluation

None currently available.

Related Publications

None currently available.


The Access to Information Policy (AIP) establishes the disclosure requirements for documents and information ADB produces or requires to be produced in its operations to facilitate stakeholder participation in ADB's decision-making. For more information, refer to the Safeguard Policy Statement, Operations Manual F1, and Operations Manual L3.

Requests for information may also be directed to the InfoUnit.

Tenders

No tenders for this project were found.

Contracts Awarded

No contracts awarded for this project were found

Procurement Plan