fbpx 54137-001: Marine Aquaculture, Reefs, Renewable Energy, and Ecotourism for Ecosystem Services | Asian Development Bank

Regional: Marine Aquaculture, Reefs, Renewable Energy, and Ecotourism for Ecosystem Services

Sovereign (Public) Project | 54137-001 Status: Active

The proposed knowledge and support technical assistance (TA) will facilitate future investment in sustainable ocean economy development through two main activities: (i) assessment of marine resource commercialization prospects (including energy, seafood, and tourism) and identification of investment projects in selected developing member countries (DMCs); and (ii) review and recommendations on policy and regulatory frameworks to facilitate large-scale investment and on mechanisms to accelerate financing of selected projects.

Project Details

Project Officer
Peters, Stephen S. Sustainable Development and Climate Change Department Request for information
Country
  • Regional
Sector
  • Energy
 
Project Name Marine Aquaculture, Reefs, Renewable Energy, and Ecotourism for Ecosystem Services
Project Number 54137-001
Country Regional
Project Status Active
Project Type / Modality of Assistance Technical Assistance
Source of Funding / Amount
TA 6619-REG: Marine Aquaculture, Reefs, Renewable Energy, & Ecotourism for Ecosystem Services
Clean Energy Fund under the Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility US$ 1.00 million
Strategic Agendas Environmentally sustainable growth
Inclusive economic growth
Regional integration
Drivers of Change Gender Equity and Mainstreaming
Governance and capacity development
Knowledge solutions
Partnerships
Private sector development
Sector / Subsector

Energy / Energy efficiency and conservation - Renewable energy generation - biomass and waste - Renewable energy generation - small hydro - Renewable energy generation - solar

Gender Equity and Mainstreaming Some gender elements
Description

The proposed knowledge and support technical assistance (TA) will facilitate future investment in sustainable ocean economy development through two main activities: (i) assessment of marine resource commercialization prospects (including energy, seafood, and tourism) and identification of investment projects in selected developing member countries (DMCs); and (ii) review and recommendations on policy and regulatory frameworks to facilitate large-scale investment and on mechanisms to accelerate financing of selected projects.

This TA is aligned with the Asian Development Bank (ADB) Strategy 2030, specifically operational plan for priority 3 under healthy oceans . The proposed TA is directly aligned with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 7 for affordable and clean energy, and is indirectly aligned with other SDGs, notably SDG 14 for life below water. The TA is also aligned with the ADB Action Plan for Healthy Ocean and Sustainable Blue Economy and targets DMCs with extensive large coastlines (_Littoral States_) and exclusive economic zones (EEZs). This TA is included in the 2020 Management approved results-based work plan of the Sustainable Development and Climate Change Department.

Project Rationale and Linkage to Country/Regional Strategy

The ocean economy today is dominated by energy production, fishing, shipping, and tourism. These activities are based on the _linear economy_ and are inherently unsustainable: ocean energy production is mainly crude oil and natural gas, marine fisheries are in effect a form of strip mining, ships run on petroleum fuels, and tourism can overwhelm the ecosystems of popular destinations. By necessity, the ocean economy of the future will be based on renewable energy production and utilization, regenerative marine aquaculture, low-emissions shipping, and ecotourism, all of which are implemented in a manner that preserves, regenerates, and enhances marine ecosystem services. In this context, archipelagic and island states (_big ocean states_) have potential comparative and competitive advantages in creating sustainable energy and food supply chains that in turn support cleaner shipping and ecotourism.

The oceans contain enough renewable energy to power our civilization however these resources are largely untapped due to the distances between resources and demand centers. Offshore wind, marine floating solar, in-stream tidal conversion, and ocean biomass can all be deployed at gigawatt scale. Marine solar and offshore wind are increasingly cost-competitive with fossil-based electricity generation and, in some locations, these are producing surplus energy which is being converted to hydrogen and oxygen using electrolysis of water. Rapid cost declines and deployment of these technologies can be expected in the next five years due to manufacturing economies of scale, technology efficiency increases, factory-based mass production of key components, and plug-and-play architecture. The challenge is to develop regenerative energy infrastructure to convert new energy generation into discrete transportable fuels or other tradable commodities such as ammonia, hydrogen, and methanol, some of which could be used as fuels for cleaner marine transport. Cultivated reefs and sustainable seafood production can be co-located with marine energy production facilities with mutually beneficial ecosystem benefits and become new tourism destinations.

Most marine seafood production in DMCs is currently unsustainable due to overfishing and illegal fishing, but this industry can be transformed if governments provide policy leadership. The potential output from advanced marine aquaculture has been estimated at more than 100 times current global seafood consumption. Seagrass cultivation and other marine permaculture can mitigate the local effects of acidification on shellfish and corals. Oceanic organisms from seagrasses to plankton add up to only 0.05% of earth's plant biomass but they cycle through about the same amount of carbon every day as all terrestrial plants. Seagrass and mangroves can sequester carbon up to 35 times faster than terrestrial forests, presenting a possible _blue carbon_ finance opportunity.

Tourism is a major contributor to today's ocean economy, but like other economic development is rarely controlled or regulated based on ecosystem services limits. Overdevelopment at popular destinations can easily overwhelm local infrastructure for water supply, wastewater and solid waste management, resulting in uncontrolled stress on local ecosystems (especially coral reefs and mangroves). As the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has dramatically reduced mass tourism, there are opportunities for _new normal_ redevelopment of tourism, integrated with renewable marine energy, regenerative marine aquaculture, and cleaner transport.

The proposed TA will facilitate an integrated development approach combining marine aquaculture, reefs, renewable energy, and ecotourism for ecosystem services (MARES), with initial emphasis on renewable energy production for value added economic activities. This TA will explore new pathways to reduce and replace fossil fuel use while responding to the challenges posed by ocean acidification, a major problem associated with greenhouse gas pollution. For example, the use of marine-based renewable energy to make _green_ hydrogen, can be implemented with minor modification of existing business models for offshore oil and gas production, offshore wind power, and traditional development of liquified natural gas export projects. The key challenge in demonstrating scalable green hydrogen supply chains is to secure advanced market commitments whereby energy consumers contract for long-term purchase of hydrogen. DMCs can reach the _tipping points_ for rapid supply chain development by creating policies, regulations, and physical space in EEZs for the gigawatt-scale investment required, most of which will need to be via private sector with commercial financing. DMCs need support to develop the cross sectoral institutional awareness. Project structuring and de-risking not unlike that used in the Cambodian Solar Park Project will be applied as appropriate.

Impact DMCs' capacity in optimizing marine resource value, creating new industries for export growth, and regenerating the marine environment improved
Project Outcome
Description of Outcome Investments to promote regenerative marine business mobilized
Progress Toward Outcome
Implementation Progress
Description of Project Outputs

Healthy ocean investments catalyzed

Knowledge in healthy oceans improved

Status of Implementation Progress (Outputs, Activities, and Issues)
Geographical Location Regional
Summary of Environmental and Social Aspects
Environmental Aspects
Involuntary Resettlement
Indigenous Peoples
Stakeholder Communication, Participation, and Consultation
During Project Design
During Project Implementation
Responsible ADB Officer Peters, Stephen S.
Responsible ADB Department Sustainable Development and Climate Change Department
Responsible ADB Division SDSC-ENE
Executing Agencies
Asian Development Bank
6 ADB Avenue,
Mandaluyong City 1550, Philippines
Timetable
Concept Clearance 05 Oct 2020
Fact Finding 18 Mar 2020 to 18 Mar 2020
MRM -
Approval 01 Dec 2020
Last Review Mission -
Last PDS Update 01 Dec 2020

TA 6619-REG

Milestones
Approval Signing Date Effectivity Date Closing
Original Revised Actual
01 Dec 2020 - 01 Dec 2020 31 Dec 2023 - -
Financing Plan/TA Utilization Cumulative Disbursements
ADB Cofinancing Counterpart Total Date Amount
Gov Beneficiaries Project Sponsor Others
0.00 1,000,000.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1,000,000.00 01 Dec 2020 0.00

Project Data Sheets (PDS) contain summary information on the project or program. Because the PDS is a work in progress, some information may not be included in its initial version but will be added as it becomes available. Information about proposed projects is tentative and indicative.

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Safeguard Documents See also: Safeguards

Safeguard documents provided at the time of project/facility approval may also be found in the list of linked documents provided with the Report and Recommendation of the President.

None currently available.

Evaluation Documents See also: Independent Evaluation

None currently available.

Related Publications

None currently available.


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Tenders

Tender Title Type Status Posting Date Deadline
Marine Aquaculture, Reefs, Renewable Energy, and Ecotourism for Ecosystem Services Firm - Consulting Closed 31 Mar 2021 14 Apr 2021
Marine Hydrogen Energy Specialist Individual - Consulting Closed 05 Feb 2021 11 Feb 2021
Cultured Reefs Specialist Individual - Consulting Closed 05 Feb 2021 11 Feb 2021
Marine Renewable Energy Specialist Individual - Consulting Closed 05 Feb 2021 11 Feb 2021
Marine Economy Specialist Individual - Consulting Closed 05 Feb 2021 11 Feb 2021
Regenerative Marine Aquaculture Specialist Individual - Consulting Closed 05 Feb 2021 11 Feb 2021

Contracts Awarded

No contracts awarded for this project were found

Procurement Plan

None currently available.