Central Banking for Financial Stability in Asia

Publication | August 2012

Review of the recent literature on systemic financial risk and a 'macroprudential' approach to surveillance and regulation including relevant lessons for central banks, especially those in Asia's emerging economies.

A key lesson of the 2007–2009 global financial crisis was the importance of containing systemic financial risk and the need for a "macroprudential" approach to surveillance and regulation that can identify system-wide risks and take appropriate actions to maintain financial stability. By virtue of their overview of the economy and the financial system and their responsibility for payments and settlement systems, there is a broad consensus that central banks should play a key role in monitoring and regulating financial stability. Emerging economies face additional challenges because of their underdeveloped financial systems and vulnerability to volatile international capital flows, especially "sudden stops" or reversals of capital inflows. This paper reviews the recent literature on this topic and identifies relevant lessons for central banks, especially those in Asia's emerging economies.

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  • Economics
  • Regional cooperation and integration