Human Capital Accumulation in Emerging Asia, 1970-2030

Publication | September 2010
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To sustain the region's human development in the next 20 years, Asian economies must invest in increasing enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels and in improving educational quality.

This study finds that high educational attainment, especially at the secondary level, has significantly improved emerging Asia’s human capital accumulation in the past 40 years. Better parental education and income, lower income inequality, declining fertility, and higher public educational expenditures contributed to higher school enrollment. It argues that for sustained human development in the next 20 years, Asian economies must invest in raising enrollment rates at the secondary and tertiary levels and in improving educational quality.

Contents

  • Abstract
  • Introduction
  • Educational Progress in Emerging Asia, 1970-2010
  • Determinants of Educational Investment
  • Projections of Human Capital Growth in Emerging Asia
  • Concluding Remarks
  • Appendix: Estimation of Enrollment Rates Based on Logistic Trend
  • References

Additional Details

Authors
Type
Series
Subjects
  • Economics
  • Poverty
  • Social protection
SKU
  • WPS102409
ISSN
  • 1655-5252 (Print)

Published Version

Lee, Jong-Wha and Ruth Francisco. 2012. "Human Capital Accumulation in Emerging Asia, 1970–2030." Japan and the World Economy 24 (2): 76–86. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.japwor.2012.01.008.

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