Integrity in Sanitation Access and Service Delivery: A Case Study of Malaysia’s Sanitation Sector

Publication | December 2020

Despite the continued efforts of international bodies, aid agencies, and governments, a huge portion of the global population still lacks safely managed sanitation.

Despite the continued efforts of international bodies, aid agencies, and governments, a huge portion of the global population still lacks safely managed sanitation. This leads to disease, death, and long-term health issues in the community and impacts human well-being and social and economic development. One major issue is equitable coverage, with poorer segments of society often being left out. Women and girls are disproportionately affected and suffer from dignity issues, anxiety, the risk of sexual assault, and lost educational opportunities. National aspirations for quality of life for the people cannot succeed without addressing sanitation issues adequately.

Key points
  • Weaknesses in the governance, management, and coordination of resource allocation is a major cause of the slow progress in ensuring global access to sanitation.
  • Policy, legislation, and organizational mandates that facilitate clear role definition, responsibility, and accountability and the efficient, effective, and ethical use of financial resources are good ingredients for integrity in any sector.
  • Malaysia’s approaches in this regard have been largely successful and are a model for adaptation elsewhere.
  • Other necessary ingredients are strong policy, strategy, planning approaches, systems, and checks and balances, making up a good governance framework.
  • Financial policies and procurement protocols promote accountability, transparency, and value for money.
  • The regulatory framework covers economic, technical, consumer, and social aspects and protects customer interests while also ensuring the sustainability of the sector.
Policy Brief No: 2020-8

Additional Details

Author
Type
Series
Subjects
  • Environment
  • Governance and public sector management
  • Health
  • Water
Countries
  • Malaysia
ISSN
  • 2411-6734