Social Development and Poverty

ADB’s central mission is working to reduce poverty in Asia and the Pacific and to ensure the benefits of economic growth and social development are equitably spread.

Adapting to Aging Asia and the Pacific

Rapid aging in Asia and the Pacific has put the region at the forefront of one of the most important global demographic trends.

Population Aging in Asia and the Pacific

With longer life expectancies and decreased fertility rates, rapid aging in Asia and the Pacific has put the region at the forefront of one of the most important global demographic trends. By 2050, one in four people in Asia and the Pacific will be over 60 years old. The population of older persons (aged over 60) in the region will triple between 2010 and 2050, reaching close to 1.3 billion people. In some countries such as the People’s Republic of China, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Viet Nam, this transition will happen very rapidly, and in others, such as Indonesia, it will not be as quick but they will end up with very large populations of older persons.

Photo: Asian Development Bank
By 2050, one in four people in Asia and the Pacific will be over 60 years old.

This demographic transition will have wide social and economic consequences on the region with implications ranging from the ways cities and communities are built and organized; the delivery and organization of health and social services; work, employment and social security as well as supportive fiscal policies. Recognizing and maximizing the social and economic contributions of the older population will be required for sustainable development.

Under its long-term corporate strategy, Strategy 2030, ADB will help improve the lives of vulnerable people in Asia and the Pacific, including the region’s aging population. This will include better infrastructure like mass public transport systems to enhance access of older persons to basic services.

Through its growing health and social protection projects, ADB will pay special attention to the long-term care and health of the region’s aging population. ADB supported several innovations in these sectors, including support for public–private partnerships to expand primary care and elderly care services in Bangladesh and the People’s Republic of China.

Photo: Asian Development Bank
Elderly folks line up to receive food from a feeding program in Manila, Philippines.

ADB helps build a knowledge base and create a knowledge network to disseminate good practices and expertise in Asia and the Pacific in the development of elderly care systems and services, as well as in the identification of potential investments in selected countries. ADB also supports the development of the capacity of developing member country officials and other stakeholders on strategic planning for and implementation of elderly care across multiple sectors, such as health, social protection, urban development, transport, and private sector development. All these efforts are aimed at ensuring that the poor and vulnerable in the Asia and Pacific region, including older people, are not left behind.

 

Perspectives on Aging

Experts

Profile Photo: Wendy Walker
Wendy Walker

Director, Human and Social Development

Profile Photo: Francesco Tornieri
Francesco Tornieri

Principal Social Development Specialist (Social Inclusion)

Profile Photo: Meredith Wyse
Meredith Wyse

Senior Social Development Specialist (Aging and Care)

Profile Photo: Oleksiy Ivaschenko
Oleksiy Ivaschenko

Senior Social Protection and Jobs Specialist

Profile Photo: Gohar Tadevosyan
Gohar Tadevosyan

Senior Social Development Specialist

Profile Photo: Louise McSorley
Louise McSorley

Social Development Specialist

Profile Photo: Babken Babajanian
Babken Babajanian

Social Development Specialist (Social Protection)

Profile Photo: Anand Ramesh Kumar
Anand Ramesh Kumar

Social Development Specialist (Social Protection)

Profile Photo: Palak Rawal
Palak Rawal

Social Development Specialist

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